A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
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Best July Activity

Best July Activity

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Published July 6, 2009

Leaving Ísafjörður on July 17, the Aurora, a 60-foot sloop yacht that has travelled around the world four times in competition, will embark on a true Viking journey of natural discovery.  Soaring the majestic northern bays around Aðalvík and Hlöðuvík, and on to Húsavík, the Aurora, captained by the seasoned Sigurður Jónsson, is hosted by Rúnar Karlsson, a true renaissance adventurer – mountaineer, paraglider, explorer and raconteur.  On the way, the soft shores of Ísafjarðardjúp boast some of the wildest untouched nature – eiders, puffins and other sea birds nest here in the thousands. The Aurora will sail along the craggy rising bluffs of Húnaflói, then into Skjálfandi bay and Húsavik, where some of Iceland’s largest whale populations can be sighted.
From Húsavík, she will continue her journey to the naturally sheltered harbour of Seyðisfjörður, then sail the Atlantic for 300 nautical miles until reaching Djúpini Sound within the Faeroe Islands.  After staying overnight at the capital, Torshavn, Rúnar and his guests will sail to Göta to catch up with the swinging G! Music Festival.  International acts, such as Martin and the Revelators, Sweden’s angry The Haunted, and the Faeroes own Lena Anderssen are heading up the bill. After the festival, the Aurora will sail around the Kirkjubønes headland and on to Iceland’s wondrous Westman Islands, where puffins are more populous than people; then to Reykjavik, home of the Grapevine, and along the coast to the Snæfellsnes peninsula, where Jules Verne began his descent into the centre of the Earth, touching the coasts along Europe’s most westerly cliffs, Látrabjarg, until reaching Ísafjörður again.
There are still one or two spots available on board.  For those looking for a sailing adventure of a lifetime, contact runar@boreaadventures.com Hurry!  



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