Russian Listening Device Found On Beach - The Reykjavik Grapevine

Russian Listening Device Found On Beach

Published July 5, 2014

A walking group of about 60 people came across a Russian seabed listening device on the beach

Nanna Árnadóttir
Photos by
Hansueli Krapf

A walking group of about 60 people came across a Russian seabed listening device on the beach

A walking group of about 60 people came across a Russian seabed listening device on the beach at Vestrahorn yesterday.

Vísir reports that it is common for submarines to drop listening devices such as the one that drifted ashore.

Seabed listening devices are used for a number of reasons. In conflicts they reflect sounds off the seabed and help detect other submarines, missiles or mines. It is also common to use listening devices to find oil via marine seismic surveying. The listening devices are towed and produce bursts of acoustic sound waves that travel through the water and map geological structures under the seabed.

A senior engineer working within oil and gas confirmed with the Grapevine today that the shape of the object indicated it was a static device and not likely to be towed behind a ship searching for oil.

Furthermore the engineer confirmed that devices of this type could easily drift 100’s of kilometres and verified that it looked very new, easily under 10 years old as it shows no signs of marine growth or corrosion.

The Icelandic Coast Guard has been notified of the device.

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