A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Eruption Pollution Likely To Hit Whole Country

No Borders Disbands

Published November 13, 2012

Refugee and immigrant rights group No Borders Reykjavík has officially disbanded.
Many readers may remember the activist group who have long contended that Iceland’s refugee and immigration policies are too restrictive and inhumane. In a recent interview, No Borders member Jórunn Edda Helgadóttir put forward the idea that she believed the “Directorate of Immigration (UTL) [should be] shut down and a new institution established in its place. That one should not be built on the UTL’s old, fascist foundations and should be staffed with people working in the interests of immigrants and refugees. It should operate as a service institution, in favour of people’s rights, not against them.”
In a statement to the press, however, the group has announced that they have disbanded.
They say that the reason for the decision arose from “personal reasons”, but that they still stand behind the cause they champion. They also point out that “No Borders is not bound to one place or one group, and can crop up anywhere, organising themselves as they see fit”. One such group, No Borders – Iceland, was founded last month.
“We encourage everyone to show refugees and immigrants support,” they write. “Focus on the abolition of borders, fight against deportations, border control and human rights violations. The struggle is just beginning.”



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