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Psychedelia and Madness: The Klink Experience

Psychedelia and Madness: The Klink Experience

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Published October 15, 2010

Klink have the reputation for being one of Iceland’s most brutal live acts, a blistering force of metalcore. They quit for a while, but got back together in 2009. And now they’re looking to take the Klink experience to the next level at the Metal Hammer night at Iceland Airwaves. We sat down with Singer Guðni and Guitarist Aggi for a quick chat….
When Klink started off a decade ago you were doing rather well, but decided to slit up after a tour with Deicide in 2004. What happened?
Aggi: Well actually we decided to call it a day a couple of years earlier, as it took us a year to quit and then we did nothing for a while. But then the offer to tour with Deicide came up and we owed a lot of people money for things like rehearsal spaces, so it made sense. It was pretty easy, flying to France and travelling in a bus with them for two weeks.
And then you decided to get back together in 2009. What the motivating factor then?
Guðni: It was Eistnaflug probably. Our manager wanted to get us back together and saw some potential in us. Also people liked the band and the live show. This time we’re together to try and get an album recorded and produced.
You’ve also got a new bass player, Haukur. How is he settling within the band?
G: Well he is handsome enough to be in Klink definitely. Plus he has muscles! He’s the only one of us who actually works out, and this makes us look even better.
Klink has been known to have a reputation as ‘bruisers’ both on and off stage. Is this a fair reputation or are you guys a bit misunderstood?
A: Well it’s not something that we mark ourselves with, but I guess we do tend to be a little drunk during concerts and kids like to come up and mess around and stuff.  
G: We do like to talk a lot of shit but it’s nothing serious. Some people do have this preconceived idea about who we are and what we are about that isn’t really us at all.
So how would you define Klink as a unit then?
G: Bad motherfuckers. Ha ha ha!
A: Psychedelia and madness.
A winning combination there. Now one thing Klink has been criticised for is the lack of recorded material. What are the current plans regarding this?
A: Well the problem is not so much new material. We actually have about two albums worth of new songs, and we are still writing stuff. We know that people want to hear more new material. The main overriding factor is money. As well as finding funds and someone to help us with recording, there are things like equipment. Our drum kit is probably the worst I’ve ever seen, and minor things like that tend to irritate you.
You’re playing the Metal Hammer Night at Iceland Airwaves. How are the preparations going for that?
A: What we doing now is rehearsing and putting together some new songs we’ve written so they’ll be ready in time for the festival. Man it’s going to be a crazy set!
G: And we’re also playing at the off venue gig at Dillon’s Bar earlier that day. People should come and check us out there first, as there is usually a really great mood when we play there.
So as grizzled veterans, what advice would you give to new bands playing Airwaves for the first time?
A: Don’t think too much about it. Just get in there and play your hearts out.
Klink plays tonight, Friday 01:10 at Sódóma.


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Grapevine TV At Airwaves 2010

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The Grapevine had a film crew documenting Airwaves this year. For a recap of this five day festival, which saw a record number of performers, check out this video by former intern Sigurður Kjartan Kristinsson and his talented film crew. It has nice coverage of some of this year’s greatest gigs and includes some fun interviews with fans and bands alike. Viewer Discretion Advised: There is some nudity. GrapevineTV at Iceland Airwaves 2010 from Raven Films on Vimeo.

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My Airwaves Discovery Of The Year: The Dandelion Seeds

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For a few depraved souls, the off-off venue Kaffistofan was the ultimate place to be on Airwaves Saturday. This venue was so underground it even failed to make the Airwaves off-venue schedule. This small white house on Hverfisgata used to serve free coffee to homeless people but a couple of years ago it was taken over by art students who’ve used it as a squat-slash-gallery. Seeing that this event kept changing its starting time on Facebook its pretty lucky that I actually got to see anything at all. The crowd counted perhaps a total of twenty people (most of them

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Oh Oh Oh Canada

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The Ring Lounge at Hressó played host to a bevy of Canadian musical marvels on Saturday for the most highly anticipated (at least for this reviewer) off-venue of the Airwaves calendar. Presented by the fine folks at the Canadian Independent Music Association (CIMA), the lineup featured some semi-known and up and coming Canadian acts offering up lo-fi electronics, brooding vocals, yelps, harmonies and autoharp. If a tree falls in the woods First up is Timber Timbre, a bluesy fold rock three-piece off the famed Arts and Crafts label. This was the one act that I was thoroughly familiar with ahead

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Efterklang Inspires A New Generation Of Efterkids

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Welcome to Efterkids, the brainchild of Danish super band Efterklang. The project, which out in February of this year, seeks to raise awareness around the issue of greater music education in public schools, as well as fundraise for increased access to music resources and equipment. Collaborating with talented kids from across the globe is an important part of this unique project. Efterklang collaborated with students from the Special Music School in New York earlier this year, and in July six talented local kids performed with the band live on stage at the Traumzeit Festival in Germany. Efterklang is currently working

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NASA – Sunday

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Photo by Hvalreki The first band to play that night was Orphic Oxtra who helped get me over my intense anger (at NASA, they charged money for water) with their fun Balkan inspired ensemble. The band is great; they have a lot of energy and play music that you could really go nuts to, if you wanted. Unfortunately no one there seemed to want to, which wasn’t too surprising given that this was the last night of five days of going nuts. The place was pretty full, though, people were mainly expressing their enjoyment through the nodding of their hungover

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Sódóma – Sunday

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Photo by Hvalreki [For whatever reason, we had the hardest time getting people to review Sódóma that Sunday night. It seems everyone wanted to be at NASA (or at home, licking their wounds). Thus, we divided the night’s duties between the above writers. Bogi Bjarnason kicks it off] The Foreign Monkeys take stage first on Sunday night. There isn’t much to report of their show. The crowd is sparse, as customary for such an early slot. The Monkeys address the crowd in English, which seems like something the minority of local bands have done to during the festival (maybe it

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