News
Prostitution In Iceland Mostly Occurring In AirBnB Apartments

Prostitution In Iceland Mostly Occurring In AirBnB Apartments

Alice Demurtas
Words by
Photos by
Art Bicnick

Published March 14, 2018

According to the Chief of the Police Human Trafficking Team Snorri Birgisson, prostitution in Iceland has recently found a safe haven in downtown AirBnB apartments, RÚV reports.

During an open meeting between the Reykjavik City Council and the Violence Prevention Committee, Snorri explained that the supply of prostitutes in Iceland has increased in the past years, but it’s so far been really hard to figure out whether the women involved are victims of human trafficking or whether they are independent contractors. However, the police are certain that local prostitution mostly relies on women who come from Romania and Hungary, likely sent to Iceland by a third party who is exploiting them financially.

Police

The role of Airbnb and social media

The police also found out that these prostitutes mostly work in AirBnB apartments located downtown. During their research, the police have been focusing mostly on apartments where individuals can get in and out without attracting too much attention or being too noticeable. “When there are more than two or three prostitutes in these apartments the flow of people going through these houses can be substantial,” Snorri says. “This traffic can look quite suspicious, so those who book these apartments look for ones whose entrances are well hidden.”

“It’s actually just as easy to find a prostitute as it is to order a pizza.”

Once the apartments are booked, prostitutes are often advertised on Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, but they can also be sent to any location at the buyer’s request. “It’s actually just as easy to find a prostitute as it is to order a pizza,” Snorri explained.

The police had already mentioned the existence of a Facebook group counting almost 500 members used by Icelandic men to discuss the pros and cons of individual prostitutes, including prices. Although buying sex is illegal in Iceland, there is little the police can do when it comes to these kinds of sites. “In some cases we have suspected the involvement of human trafficking, but it’s often difficult to reach these individuals,” Snorri had told Visir in February. “They often prefer not to comment on their situation or even refuse our assistance.”


News
Iceland To Be Overrun By NATO Exercises, Reviving Anti-Militarist Sentiment

Iceland To Be Overrun By NATO Exercises, Reviving Anti-Militarist Sentiment

by

Concerted NATO war exercises will be conducted across the North Atlantic this coming October and November, Iceland included. The announcement

News
Fired Employee Sues Icelandic Energy Company That Ignored Her Harassment Claims

Fired Employee Sues Icelandic Energy Company That Ignored Her Harassment Claims

by

Áslaug Thelma Einarsdóttir announced on her Facebook page this week that she is planning to file a lawsuit after being

News
Controversial Icelandic Independence Festival Spent 22 Million ISK On Lighting Alone

Controversial Icelandic Independence Festival Spent 22 Million ISK On Lighting Alone

by

The festival celebrating 100 years since the Union Treaty between Iceland and Denmark that was held in Þingvellir National Park

News
Poll: Social Dems Rise, Left-Greens Bouncing Back, Conservatives In Slow Decline

Poll: Social Dems Rise, Left-Greens Bouncing Back, Conservatives In Slow Decline

by

The Social Democrats are continuing their upward trajectory, according to the latest poll from Market and Media Research. The Left-Greens

News
Excited For Autumn In Iceland? Too Bad, Winter Is Coming

Excited For Autumn In Iceland? Too Bad, Winter Is Coming

by

You may have seen some of Grapevine’s posts on the beauty of autumn in Iceland. While the autumnal equinox will

News
Iceland’s Naming Laws May Soon Change For The Better

Iceland’s Naming Laws May Soon Change For The Better

by

Þorsteinn Víglundsson, an MP for the Reform Party, will soon submit a bill to Parliament that would drastically change Iceland’s

Show Me More!