News
2,500 New Apartments To Be Built In Reykjavík By 2018

2,500 New Apartments To Be Built In Reykjavík By 2018

Published February 7, 2013

The City of Reykjavík has mapped potential areas within the downtown area for the construction of 2,500 new apartments in the next 3 to 5 years, with an expected 14,500 new apartments to be built by 2030.
City Council Chairman Dagur B. Eggertsson is heading the group that has been assessing the possibility of building more residential apartments in the city, a project that has been ongoing for the past two years, Vísir reports.
“Firstly, a new master plan is being developed in the city, as it is clear that this is needed. Second, the City Council agrees that we need a new housing policy that focuses on more diverse and secure housing, primarily rental housing and residential apartments. Thirdly, the focus will be on how people get around, we’re interested in trying to reduce the operating costs of households by enabling people to live where they can enjoy reduced transportation costs,” said Dagur.
The effort to reduce transportation costs will be achieved through developing new rental residences with limited parking spaces available, thereby encouraging tenants to make use of public transit or other alternate means of transport
Dagur emphasizes that the new housing developments will not guarantee that rental prices will fall throughout the city, however he is hopeful that developing the rental market will create a balance among the residences available. It is further hoped that introducing new residential property in Reykjavík will help the city avoid a housing bubble, as renting or owning a property in the city center is currently very expensive and the costs are only increasing.


News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Við Erum Best!

by

At last count, there were 326,340 people living in Iceland. That’s .0045% of the world’s population and while it isn’t really a competition, this has created a bit of an inferiority complex among some Icelanders who, as Grapevine writer Oddur Sturluson put it, “find it nothing short of scandalous that their small, unarmed country doesn’t have as much political pull as some of their larger, more powerful neighbours.” To compensate, Oddur argued, Icelanders “invented something brilliant in its simplicity and devastating in its effectiveness…The Per Capita Record.” This, he explained, is “quite simply when Iceland does something noticeable, compared to

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland’s Symphony Conductor Joins Protest In Tel Aviv

by

Conductor and Music Director of the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Ilan Volkov, will lead an ensemble of musicians at an anti-war protest tomorrow in Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square, reports Slipped Disc. The protest will call for peace talks and an end to the occupation. A number of other cultural personalities have pledged their support and will be participating.  “We will do some improvised vocal and instrumental response to the situation. It is a small part of an evening with many other performances.” said Ilan.  The group will gather in the square at 8pm. Their slogan reads: ‘We stand together against the silence

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Sturla Turns 800

by

A celebration is planned in Dalasýsla this weekend to mark 800 years since the birth of saga writer Sturla Þórðarson, reports Vísir. The guest of honour will be former president Vigdís Finnbogadóttir and guest speakers include; Speaker of the House Einar K. Guðfinnsson, Norwegian politician Olemic Thommessen, writer Einar Kárason and director of the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Guðrún Nordal. Sturla Þórðarson, Snorri Sturluson’s nephew and pupil, was a chieftain as well as a saga and contemporary history writer active in the 13th century. His most famous work is Íslendinga saga, the longest saga within Sturlunga saga. In the wake of the dissolution of

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Foreign Committee To Meet Over Gaza

by

Iceland’s Foreign Affairs Committee will meet to discuss the situation in Gaza, although the Foreign Minister has called it “pointless” to cut ties with Israel. RÚV reports that Birgir Ármannsson, the chairperson of the Foreign Affairs Committee, will call together the committee to discuss the situation in Gaza. “The events that we have been closely following are of course tragic, and they cause us a lot of worry,” he told reporters. “The news that is being reported, daily now, underlines the seriousness of the issue.” The committee’s meeting is in response to a request from Left-Green MP Svandís Svavarsdóttir to

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Progressive Leadership On The Defensive

by

As more Progressives leave the party, tensions continue to rise. Last week, former Reykjavík city council candidate Hreiðar Eiríksson announced he was leaving the Progressive Party over remarks Progressive city council candidate Sveinbjörg Birna Sveinbjörnsdóttir made during campaign season, as well as the party leadership’s silence on the matter. Sveinbjörg said she would revoke the granting of a plot of land for Iceland’s Muslims to build a mosque. Other remarks were made by her, and other Progressives, which also used Islam as a campaign point. This is the same reason former Progressive alternate MP Þorsteinn Magnússon gave the Grapevine for

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Seal Census Volunteers Needed

by

Volunteers are requested to take part in an official counting of seals in northwest Iceland. MBL reports that people with a proclivity for nature in general and seals in particular are being asked to take part in the census this Sunday. The census is being conducted by The Icelandic Seal Centre in Hvammstangi, northwest Iceland. Not all of the seals of Iceland’s coast will be counted. Instead, researchers and volunteers will take a 100-kilometre stretch of beach in West Húnaþing and divide it up into smaller areas, which will then be portioned out to seal counters. While seals are an

Show Me More!