A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Eruption Pollution Likely To Hit Whole Country
Culture
Track Of Issue
Track Of The Issue: Sindri Eldon – “Honeydew”

Track Of The Issue: Sindri Eldon – “Honeydew”

From ‘Bitter & Resentful’

Published September 12, 2014

If garage rock from the mid-90s is your kind of thing, then you, my friend, are going to love Sindri Eldon. Although the artist may be in his late twenties, he channels his inner cynical teenage self through his music, as can be clearly heard in “Honeydew.” The lyrics focus on a quintessential teenage problem: whether to make someone feel better by saying you love them when you don’t. The sound may be garage-y, but the arrangement is anything but sloppy, as the ever-so-slightly lazy bass, lightly distorted guitars and snappy drums all get a chance to shine before coming together in the chorus.

Take a trip down memory lane, and check out the song’s video, too, as it is absolutely smashing in its early-MTV-esque purposeful amateurishness. It also portrays Sindri in his three true forms: shaved, stubbly and bearded.

Download track here (right click and save as).


Culture
Track Of Issue
<?php the_title(); ?>

Free Pink Street Boys Album! Free Editorial! Free Love!

by

Here is a short editorial, inspired by the late, great Bill Gates and his vision, which continues to warm our hearts and our thighs through our pockets, via sturdy, glowing Gorilla Glass: Here’s to the volcanos. The eruptions. The shaking moneymakers. The ones who remind the world that, yes, we exist. While some may see them as extremely dangerous and not to be trifled with, we see them as tremendous opportunities for market expansion, advanced brand awareness building and vast merchandizing profits. Because the people who are arrogant enough to shamelessly exploit potentially catastrophic events, are the ones who make bank.

Culture
Track Of Issue
<?php the_title(); ?>

Free Track: Prins Póló’s “París Norðursins”

by and

You won’t find Prins Póló’s unexpected summer hit “París norðursins” (“Paris Of The North”) on the act’s recent LP ‘Sorrí’ (‘Sorry’). Written and recorded specifically for the purpose, the song features in a highly anticipated film of the same name, which hits theatres in early September and should be pretty great if the Prince’s contribution is anything to go by. The track’s steadily humming, upbeat bass line is accompanied with occasional keys and distorted guitar segments, all wrapped up in a fun and danceable package. Hiding behind that cheerful façade are lyrics that explore a recurring bitter theme in Icelandic

Culture
Track Of Issue
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of Issue: Reykjavíkurdætur

by

To those that don’t understand Icelandic, “D.R.U.S.L.A.” (which roughly translates to ‘S.L.U.T.’) may seem just like an upbeat synth-y song with a hip hop-y vibe and a few “bitch” shouts. The lyrics, however, deal with a rather serious topic: slut-shaming and victim-blaming. The message, in typical Reykjavíkurdætur fashion, is that it doesn’t matter how you dress, whether you are wearing makeup or under the influence, that doesn’t give anyone an excuse to violate your autonomy. The song then goes into the fact that people who are raped face an uphill legal battle in order to get justice, as there is

Culture
Track Of Issue
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of Issue: Grísalappalísa’s “Nýlendugata-Pálsbæjarvör-Grótta”

by

This frantic and irreverent song is the band’s very first single off of their new album, ‘Rökrétt Framhald’ (“Logical Progression”). The lyrics focus on a person sneaking out of their home and going on a wild ride through Reykjavík, and in typical Grísalappalísa style, also highlight the banality of life in the city. The chorus in particular drives the point home that nothing is new under the sun, counting up the things the protagonist sees, such as grey skies, empty streets and neon lights, before ending with “et cetera.” The instrumentals further accentuate the contrast between the band’s two singers;

Culture
Track Of Issue
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of The Issue: Uni Stefson’s “Enginn Grætur”

by

Unnsteinn Manuel Stefánsson of super band Retro Stefson has recently started a solo project known as Uni Stefson, and it is equally worth following. For his latest release, he sings a poem written in 1844 by celebrated poet and independence hero Jónas Hallgrímsson. The poem is a decidedly melancholic ode to lost love, written as if the poet were on his deathbed (which he was a year later). Unnsteinn’s soulful rendition starts slowly, builds up momentum organically and is enhanced by soft synths that play sounds reminiscent of church organs, further adding to the macabre and dramatic vibe of the

Culture
Track Of Issue
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of Issue: Myndra’s “Distant Lover”

by

The first 20 seconds of “Distant Lover” give little insight into its edgy, restive and bittersweet nature, but wispy, fluttering guitars soon reveal the dichotomy at its heart. Both Linus Lárpera’s breezy vocals and his distant lover’s calm body movements juxtapose with the song’s skittish and asynchronous drumbeat, as well as the nervous thoughts that linger on within both. Furthermore, luscious, ethereal synths in the song’s break give it a relaxing ‘sentimental sunset drive’ feel as Linus’s wordless murmurings on the chorus give the impression of him (and by proxy, you) leaving sentimental troubles behind. It’s cathartic without being angsty,

Show Me More!