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Everything Everything Have Never Read Naomi Klein

Everything Everything Have Never Read Naomi Klein

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Published October 13, 2010

“I grew up without a TV in the middle of nowhere and was always encouraged to use my imagination, I learned some instruments and downloaded a really crap sequencer and just spent all my time making music. I kept playing because it makes me feel alive, and it’s loads better than nearly every job in the world.”
Tell us a little bit about yourself: who you are, what you do, why you
do it. Remember: Hype is for PR departments, honesty is for musicians.

We are a band from the four corners of the UK and we are based in Manchester. We make music because it makes us feel excited and useful in the world, whatever that means.
Do you have anything special you want to accomplish by coming to Iceland? What?
My parents took my sister and brother there when we were children and I never got to go. I’ve always wanted to see the sulphur and lava and steam – we probably won’t have time though, unfortunately.
We won’t have you pin yourself down in a genre, but maybe you can tell
us what musicians you hope your fans also like. What music inspires you?

Steve Reich, Eno, Phillip Glass, lots of American alternative rock bands from our teenage years, American R&B like Destiny’s Child, post rock bands. Lot of America really, and the Beatles.
And what would you want to tell our readers, to convince them to come
to your show (remember: you are not in marketing, you are an artist)?

I would just say that we give a lot into what we create and also how we perform, hopefully you can get a lot out of it if you see it.
What got you making music in the first place? What kept you playing?
I grew up without a TV in the middle of nowhere and was always encouraged to use my imagination, I learned some instruments and downloaded a really crap sequencer and just spent all my time making music. I kept playing because it makes me feel alive, and it’s loads better than nearly every job in the world.
What do you like these days? Anything we should know about?
Mammal Club, Dutch Uncles, Clock Opera, Visions of Trees – all of which we are taking in our tour.
Your bio states that an R&B cliché can sound great when played by
four skinny white men. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? Are you implying that music is more about context than content? Or do you just like skinny white
men better than chubby black women?

I love chubby black women. I’m not sure any of us ever said that, our bio isn’t totally accurate. Context can certainly have a big influence on things, if I sing ‘like whoa!’ or Beyoncé sings it there is a clear juxtaposition at work between our two worlds that creates new ways of interpreting the music.
Naomi Klein as lyrical influence: discuss.
I have never read anything by Naomi Klein, it’s another inaccuracy of our bio, I think the author wanted to allude to the fact we talk a bit about commerciality and big business in some songs. I don’t really have any lyrical influences.
Make a five track playlist for your planeride over. Tell us why each
track is there. Your scenario: you’re just about to land, and you want
to mentally prepare yourself for whatever you think is going to meet
you.

Suicide – Frankie Teardrop – A great flying song.
Metallica – Frantic – Nervous about touching down.
Meat Loaf – Wasted Youth – Doors opening.
Cher – Walking in Memphis – Going through customs.
Mike and the Mechanics – Over My Shoulder – Hello everybody!
Anything to add?
Check out our album!
Everything Everything play today, Wednesday 22:50 at Listasafn.


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