A Grapevine service announcement Be patient: That eruption is expected to last until 2015
Culture
Music
Rocky Mountain Hydro Grind

Rocky Mountain Hydro Grind

Published July 31, 2012

After forming in Denver, Colorado, twenty years ago, death grind mainstays Cephalic Carnage laboured in relative obscurity in the American extreme metal underground until their 2000 Relapse Records signing and subsequent release of their sophomore album, death grind masterpiece ‘Exploiting Dysfunction.’ The band, often hailed as the most inventive band in metal, strives to marry genre bending oddness with brutality and, most importantly, stellar songwriting. Earning major accolades in the metal press for their every output, the band nevertheless remains tongue-in-cheek as it attacks genres as varied as black metal and metalcore with musical parodies while adding features of every musical style from jazz to doom. Nökkvi (Gone Postal, Svartidauði) and I sat down with two of these of self-proclaimed potheads to get the straight scoop.
Bogi: I saw you guys play seven years ago and the show was pretty ferocious. Is the band still that powerful on stage?
Steve: It definitely is.
Leonard: We’ve turned down the craziness but we still retain the energy. We don’t have the same members now so it’s a different kind of energy. You twist your ankle a couple of times you stop jumping around as much. But it’s what it needs to be, you know.
Bogi: There was definitely a big leap between your debut album ‘Conforming to Abnormality’ and sophomore record ‘Exploiting Dysfunction.’ What was it that happened during that time frame?
Leonard: I always thought of ‘Conforming…’ as our first real demo. It was just a stepping stone to get there, but you know the songs we were just writing with Steve and John at the time…
Steve: ‘Conforming…’ was like me and John the drummer came from a band and Leonard and Zach were Cephalic and we just kinda wrote and meshed our style and their style but not really together yet, they had their individual songs and our songs. They were already kinda pre-written songs for the other bands and the ‘Exploiting..’ were all of us together and that were we started…
Nökkvi :“Jihad”?
Steve: Yeah that was the first song that we wrote together actually. And then there was “Hybrid”.
Bogi: Why is “Hybrid” not on the set list tonight, or any other songs off of ‘Exploiting…’?
Steve: It’s the member changes. The people we have playing with us don’t know so much. They had to learn what they could in a quick time. We focus more on the ‘Anomalies’ and ‘Lucid Interval’ era and, you know ‘Misled by Certainty’ as well.
Bogi: And just one song off of ‘Xenosapien’?
Steve: Yeah, “Endless Cycle of Violence.” That’s a song people like and they’d be pretty bummed out if we didn’t play it…
Nökkvi: Do you guys agree on the best Cephalic album, or is it always the newest one?
Both: Mine is always the latest one.
Bogi: Do you often come up with tracks that are just too far out there and you have to throw away?
Leonard: No not yet.
Steve: There’s riffs that get that get rejected for sure.
Bogi: Nothing that is just too wild?
Steve: No, no. The only thing we ever did that was real weird is that we recorded some covers, among them a Faith No More song that never got released. It would have been really cool but it was taking too long and we were recording our album and trying to focus on not just making this a FNM song. It takes all this time and production to make it sound like that.
Nökkvi: What I really like about Cephalic Carnage, and this is gonna sound a bit cliché, is the variety and the mix. Not a lot of bands mix genres like that.
Steve: Not a lot of bands listen to Mr. Bungle either. Mr. Bungle are the kings of transition. Otherwise you just have a lot of riffs, but if they don’t connect to the riff that it goes after…
Bogi: Then you just have Origin…
Steve: Hehehe…
Here Nökkvi and the guys enter a long conversation about Mr. Bungle….
Bogi: Will we be seeing a new album in 2013?
Steve: I think so yeah.
Leonard: It should be our funnest record yet.
Bogi: That guy on the answering machine (a lengthy sample on ‘Exploiting Dysfunction’ with a pissed of guy going on about money the band owes him)?
Steve: That was on my pager. Not something we could even answer, that’s how old it was. He was going on about a CD that was out of print on Headfuckers Records. We met the guy and he was big, like 6 foot 8. If you notice in the conversation he was talking lots of shit but when we met him he was all like “I wasn’t really saying anything…”
Bogi: Do you usually get high before a show?
Leonard: We just get high whenever. Being stoned is fun; it gets you numbed to the situation. If you sit there and go “Oh jeez, there 1,300 people out there tonight, man we have to play amazing,” you’re gonna kill yourself mentally, you’re gonna beat yourself up and when you go out there on stage you’re already gonna be mentally tired and it may hinder your performance…



Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

New Video And Tour Dates From Lay Low

by

Humble folk singer-songwriter Lovísa Elísabet Sigrúnardóttir, aka. Lay Low, has just released a self-directed video to her song “One Of Those Nights” from the 2013 album ‘Talking About The Weather.’ Lovísa describes it thusly: “The song is called One of those Nights, and is a stripped down hummaby that I wrote after one of those nights back home in Iceland.” Check it out! Lay Low is currently on tour. She’ll play in New York, USA, at the CMJ Music Week on October 23 and 24. She also has four shows booked at Iceland Airwaves. November 5: Harpa Norðurljós at 23:20-00:00 November

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

The Mengi Set

by

Amongst the fast-changing merry-go-round of music venues in Reykjavík’s city centre, something unusual sprang up around last Christmas: a small, homely, unassuming performance space on Oðinsgata, called Mengi. It appeared quite suddenly, passed around initially only by word of mouth, but quickly become a well-liked venue hosting three shows a week for an intimate, fifty-strong audience. One of the people behind Mengi is bassist, guitarist and composer Skúli Sverrisson. Having lived in New York for over two decades, Skúli had recently moved back to Reykjavík when the project began. “I had been living in a very big city for 25

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

Akranes: Where Busted Amps Go!

by

After carefully lugging my vintage guitar amplifier all the way from New York to Iceland, I foolishly plugged it in without a power transformer. There was an unusually loud humming noise and then it started smoking. The smell of burned plastic gently wafted around my flat. My panicky brain immediately cycled through these thoughts: Smart move, Matt, not only will your wife kill you for nearly burning the place down, but also you’ve fried your amp. There was no avoiding the first problem. The second might just require a good repair guy. I started asking around and all of my

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

Quarashi’s Music Video Odyssey

by

Quarashi is an Icelandic rap group founded in the mid-90s by Sölvi Blöndal, Steinar “Steini” Fjeldsted and Höskuldur “Hössi” Ólafsson (Hössi left the group in early 2003, and was succeeded by Egill “Tiny” Thorarensen). The band recently resurfaced with “Rock On,” their first single after a nine-year hiatus. We spoke with founding members Sölvi and Steini about their history as a band and what thoughts went into making their latest music video. “Switchstance,” 1997 Director: Arnar Jónasson (director of the documentary ‘Rafmögnuð Reykjavík’ (‘Electronica Reykjavík’) Steini: That was the first thing we did, in the way of a song and

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

We Want The Airwaves

by and

We are thrilled to announce that Straumur will host its own Iceland Airwaves off-venue programme at Bíó Paradís, November 5-9. We will have many of our favourite artists perform, including lo-fi indie duo Nolo, who are currently working on their third LP; the ever-so-talented M-band, who released his first album this year; and the hazy newcomer Pretty Please. We are currently in negotiations with other mind-bending acts and we’ll let you know when the results are in. In other news, standard bearers of the domestic disco scene Boogie Trouble just released a new single from their forthcoming and as-yet unnamed

Culture
Music
<?php the_title(); ?>

Time To Get Planny! The Airwaves Schedule Is Up

by

In case anyone missed it, Iceland Airwaves have released the official festival schedule in the shape of this handy PDF. Once you’ve scanned the lineup (and, if your taste lies on the art-pop side, realised with mounting horror that Future Islands (pictured) and The Knife are a direct Saturday night clash), you can head over to the Airwaves website and start constructing your personalised schedule here. The festival’s official lineup kicks off on the evening of Wednesday 5th November, but for early arrivals or particularly eager festival-goers, there’ll be music throughout Wednesday daytime too. The “off-venue” schedule will be dropping

Show Me More!