Pylsuspjall: The Best of Reykjavík

Pylsuspjall: The Best of Reykjavík

1. Hot Dog Chat 2. A Brief Conversation Held With Strangers Holding Sausages

Photos by
Arnulfo Hermes

Published August 1, 2014

Today’s Topic: Reykjavík Pride 2014

Welcome to our seventh edition of Pylsuspjall, a feature in which we accost strangers at the Bæjarins Beztu hot dog stand and ask them questions. This time, in anticipation of Reykjavík Pride 2014, we ask them about the city’s LGBTQIA community.

What’s your name?
Nick Guros

Where are you from?
California, originally, but I’m living in Boston, Massachusetts [USA].

What do you do for a living?
I’m a biotech engineer.

What do you think makes these hot dogs so good?
I guess it’s all the different toppings they have.

Describe Iceland in three words.
Beautiful. Scenic. Cold.

Are you aware of the gay scene in town?
I’ve heard a little bit about it, like the Gay Pride parade. I won’t be here, but it sounds fun.

How many Gay Pride parades/celebrations have you been to?
I’ve been to one in San Francisco. I just happened to be there that day.

Do you know what letter of LGBTQIA stands for?
Some of them. It’s lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual, transgender, q is probably queer, i…I should know that one [It’s intersex]. The last one I think is asexual?

What do you think about same-sex marriage being legal in Iceland?
That’s great! It’s good that it’s been accepted.

Did you know that Jon Gnarr, our last mayor, dressed in drag and led the Pride parade last year? What do you think about that?
I’ve heard of this guy before. I’ve seen him in some pretty funny costumes, and know that he’s a comedian. I didn’t know that he dressed in drag for that. That’s an exceptional comedic act.

Though Iceland is very progressive, it only ranked 10th in the world for Gay and Trans Rights in Europe. What do you think can be improved?
That’s tough. Iceland’s seemed very open and friendly since I’ve been here, but I guess I haven’t seen any signs of an organised group. Maybe they can lobby the government to pass more laws in their favour.

What’s your name?
Peter Lightfoot

Where are you from?
England, from the midlands.

What do you do for a living?
I’m an electrician.

What do you think makes these hot dogs so good?
The fact that they’re everywhere!

Describe Iceland in three words.
Cold. Warm. Spectacular.

Are you aware of the gay scene in town?
No.

Do you know what letter of LGBTQIA stands for?
No, not at all. [Reporter tells him what they are.] Wow, a shorter name would be better.

What do you think about same-sex marriage being legal in Iceland?
Yeah, oh yeah.

Did you know that Jon Gnarr, our last mayor, dressed in drag and led the Pride parade last year? What do you think about that?
I think that’s brilliant!

Though Iceland is very progressive, it only ranked 10th in the world for Gay and Trans Rights in Europe. What do you think can be improved?
I wouldn’t really know. Should there even be a ranking system? Seems pretty subjective.


What’s your name?
Aníta Rós Pétursdóttir

Where are you from?
Reykjavík, Iceland.

What do you do for a living?
I work at a kindergarten.

What do you think makes these hot dogs so good?
They put Pilsner in the water they boil them in.

Describe Iceland in three words.
Cold. Beautiful. Friendly.

Are you aware of the gay scene in town?
Yeah.

How many Gay Pride parades/celebrations have you been to?
I’ve been to 10 or something. For this year’s I could be out of town, but I will go if I am here.

Do you know what letter of LGBTQIA stands for?
Nope.

What do you think about same-sex marriage being legal in Iceland?
It’s great.

Did you know that Jon Gnarr, our last mayor, dressed in drag and led the Pride parade last year? What do you think about that?
I liked it.

Though Iceland is very progressive, it only ranked 10th in the world for Gay and Trans Rights in Europe. What do you think can be improved?
I don’t know. It could be better, sure, but I can’t think of how to improve. I think we’ve done well so far.


Hungry for more hot dog chats?

The Best Of Reykjavík

Whaling in Iceland

Iceland’s Love Scene

Iceland’s Bar Scene

Downtown Hotels



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