Travel
Destinations
Festivals

Festivals

Words by

Published March 23, 2010

There’s a lot going on in Iceland’s capitol this month. We’re sure you’re all hyped up for DesignMarch, Reykjavík Fashion Festival and the Reykjavík Blues Festival. These are all surefire events, and it will be time to find time to go to work and stuff between all the parties and hangovers and cleaning broken bottles and condoms out of your back yard and all.
Yeah, Reykjavík is all fine and dandy, but the rest of the island can be pretty damn awesome too, as you should learn for yourself. And you know what – they have festivals out there too! That’s not all; two of the more awesome ones are happening THIS VERY MARCH. Namely Aldrei fór ég suður (“I never went south”) music festival in Ísafjörður and the 700.is Reindeerland experimental film and video festival in Egilsstaðir. You should go there.
700.is Reindeerland – March 20-27
For the fifth year running, the good people of Egilsstaðir are staging an insanely ambitious film and video festival in the East Iceland. This weeklong film festival has been steadily gaining acclaim and momentum since debuting in 2006, and for good reason too. The programme is meticulously put together and will screen a total of 77 pieces over its weeklong. There are furthermore lectures, exhibitions and parties to your heart’s delight. Grapevine urges you to expand your horizons and check out the artiest film-fest Iceland has to offer. The East of Iceland is also freakishly beautiful to boot. More info at www.700.is.
Aldrei fór ég suður, April 2-4
Any plans for Easter? If yes, dismiss them. Now. Seriously, there is but one Easter activity worthy of your attention. And boy is it worthy. So secure your ride to Ísafjörður NOW and be prepared to enjoy two days of the finest music Icelandic has to offer at Aldrei fór ég suður. This legendary bash has been an annual event since 2004, and is definitely not an insider tip any more. It’s still just as awesome as when it was.  This year’s line-up is very promising already, even though they haven’t announced half of it yet: Bloodgroup, Hjaltalín, Morðingjarnir, Hudson Wayne, Ólöf Arnalds and legendary Ísafjörður grungemasters Urmull are all confirmed to play. By the way, there are no tickets available. Why? Because the whole thing’s for FREE! See y’all there.



Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland In Miniature

by

Having planned to spend much of this summer—my first summer in Iceland, in fact—gallivanting around the country, I’ve instead spent most of my time in the city, close to home. But today, I’m lucky. In the name of research, my partner and I get twelve hours to explore the Snæfellsnes peninsula. This is “Iceland in miniature,” I’ve been told, a veritable “Best Of” sampler where many of the country’s most sought-out natural wonders exist side by side. Above The Lava Field Circumnavigating the whole peninsula would only take about three hours, but with limited time at our disposal, we decide

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

A School For The Beer-Curious

by

In a small lecture hall doubling as a private bar, twenty men raise their glasses and have a big gulp of Egils Gull as Stefán “Stebbi” Pálsson begins the bjórskólinn (“beer school”) curriculum. The school is hosted by Ölgerðin, one of Iceland’s two largest breweries, and offers the obtuse a chance to learn more about beer and its culture. We recommend that students don’t arrive on an empty stomach and pace themselves, as even the hardiest of people can be toppled by the school’s free refills. We begin our adventure by looking into the history of beer and its culture.

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Furiously Chasing Tranquility In Ísafjörður

by

Through my travels, I’ve been lucky enough to meet a ton of Icelanders who have become some of my closest friends—I might call them family. At this point, I’m proud to say I’m fully enmeshed in the “Icelandic Connection” now, which means being open to Icelandic travellers (individuals, artists, musicians, grandparents—you name it) to my home in Philadelphia. The “Iceland Connected” have a code to my home’s lockbox for easy access. If you don’t mind cats, the place is yours. Be in touch. I’ve thus gone to Iceland a couple of times, and always greatly enjoyed my visits. This time,

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Where Are The Glowing Rocks?

by

As you would expect, many visitors to Iceland are more than eager to view the country’s famous volcanoes. They may, however, be surprised to discover little more than rugged, cold lava flows and non-smoking volcanoes. These are of course fine sights, but they’re not the glowing lava and fuming craters that many expect from one of the most active volcanic regions of the world. The explanation is rather simple: One needs to happen upon a live magma-spouting event to see those spectacular sights, and those occur roughly once every three to four years. ICELAND IS BORN Iceland formed gradually over

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Not For Your Average Latté-Drinker

by

“What are all these people doing here?” a guy asked his mate in the fourth row. “Beats me,” he replied, looking up at us as we walked past to find our seats on Air Iceland’s 37-seat Dash 8 bound for Ilulissat. Home to 5,000 people and 7,000 dogs, Ilulissat in West Greenland is not exactly your typical holiday destination. After all, its only international connection is Reykjavík, which is already in the middle of the North Atlantic—at least five hours from the United States and three from mainland Europe. From Reykjavík though, it’s just four hours to the west coast

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

High Hopes For Husavík

by

The northeast of Iceland has been steadily growing in popularity as a tourism destination, and small wonder, as it has a lot to offer. Just off the Ring Road, there are the haunting Dimmuborgir (“Dark Cities”), which have served as inspiration for many a troll story as well as for a Norwegian black metal band of the same name. When you see the rock formations, which look as if they were sculpted by an artistically challenged Goth, you can see why. If the scenery looks otherworldly, you aren’t the first to think so. It was here at Eldhraun (“Fire Lava,”

Show Me More!