A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
Free Pink Street Boys Album! Free Editorial! Free Love!

Free Pink Street Boys Album! Free Editorial! Free Love!

Editorial In Chief

Published August 29, 2014

Here is a short editorial, inspired by the late, great Bill Gates and his vision, which continues to warm our hearts and our thighs through our pockets, via sturdy, glowing Gorilla Glass:

Here’s to the volcanos. The eruptions. The shaking moneymakers. The ones who remind the world that, yes, we exist. While some may see them as extremely dangerous and not to be trifled with, we see them as tremendous opportunities for market expansion, advanced brand awareness building and vast merchandizing profits.

Because the people who are arrogant enough to shamelessly exploit potentially catastrophic events, are the ones who make bank.

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

PSB4

Here is a review of Pink Street Boys’ cassette-exclusive release, which is called Trash From The Boys:

Trash From The Boys is the best Icelandic album I have heard for a long time. It might be the best Icelandic album ever made. That might well be. I don’t know.

Like a 21st century version of a younger, angrier, hungrier, dirtier, perverser, more cynical, more poisonus, more self-destructiverer version of that band Singapore Sling (I really miss Singapore Sling), Pink Street Boys provide a perfect and, frankly, much-needed antidote to all that hey! business that’s been contaminating our airwaves of late.

This is neither wholesome nor pretty. I haven’t been able to discern any lyrics, but I’m fairly certain they’ll prove kind of dumb and exciting. The band themselves don’t come off as particularly handsome or smart. I’m not sure they’re great at playing their instruments. I love them. I love their album.

They’re just what Reykjavík, needs.

Thank you, Pink Street Boys.

Download the album here.


Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

I CHOOSE TREASON

by

I just signed up to become a founding member of Fylkisflokkurinn (“The County-Party”), which has the stated purpose and sole platform of campaigning for Iceland to re-join Norway and become its twentieth county. I was the 573rd Icelander to do so according to the would-be political party’s website (fylkisflokkurinn.is), while the Facebook group that launched it currently lists over 4,600 members (many of them very enthusiastic!) and counting. Proponents of Iceland’s independence might call me a traitor to the country that bore me—they might even go so far as to accuse me of treason. And I won’t lie: I felt

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Free Track: Prins Póló’s “París Norðursins”

by and

You won’t find Prins Póló’s unexpected summer hit “París norðursins” (“Paris Of The North”) on the act’s recent LP ‘Sorrí’ (‘Sorry’). Written and recorded specifically for the purpose, the song features in a highly anticipated film of the same name, which hits theatres in early September and should be pretty great if the Prince’s contribution is anything to go by. The track’s steadily humming, upbeat bass line is accompanied with occasional keys and distorted guitar segments, all wrapped up in a fun and danceable package. Hiding behind that cheerful façade are lyrics that explore a recurring bitter theme in Icelandic

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of Issue: Reykjavíkurdætur

by

To those that don’t understand Icelandic, “D.R.U.S.L.A.” (which roughly translates to ‘S.L.U.T.’) may seem just like an upbeat synth-y song with a hip hop-y vibe and a few “bitch” shouts. The lyrics, however, deal with a rather serious topic: slut-shaming and victim-blaming. The message, in typical Reykjavíkurdætur fashion, is that it doesn’t matter how you dress, whether you are wearing makeup or under the influence, that doesn’t give anyone an excuse to violate your autonomy. The song then goes into the fact that people who are raped face an uphill legal battle in order to get justice, as there is

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

A Growing Divide?

by

It’s that time of year again, when everybody is talking about everybody else’s salary. “Did you see? Grímur Karl Sæmundsen [CEO of the Blue Lagoon] makes 6.2 million per month [645,000 USD per year],” someone will say. “Wow, Davíð Oddsson [Editor of daily newspaper Morgunblaðið and former Prime Minister and head of the Central Bank] makes 3,3 million per month [345,000 USD per year],” another will say. “Did you see how grossly underrepresented women are amongst the top earners?” It might sound strange to foreign readers, but Icelanders’ salaries come under scrutiny every July, when income tax data becomes publicly

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of Issue: Grísalappalísa’s “Nýlendugata-Pálsbæjarvör-Grótta”

by

This frantic and irreverent song is the band’s very first single off of their new album, ‘Rökrétt Framhald’ (“Logical Progression”). The lyrics focus on a person sneaking out of their home and going on a wild ride through Reykjavík, and in typical Grísalappalísa style, also highlight the banality of life in the city. The chorus in particular drives the point home that nothing is new under the sun, counting up the things the protagonist sees, such as grey skies, empty streets and neon lights, before ending with “et cetera.” The instrumentals further accentuate the contrast between the band’s two singers;

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Welcome To Our Sixth Annual Best Of Issue

by

As we were accenting the í’s and crossing the ð’s of our annual ‘Best of Reykjavík’ issue, a Facebook friend of Reykjavík Grapevine’s threw a bit of criticism our way that absolutely bears mention and further discussion. In response to one of the many “what’s the best X” in Reykjavík inquiries we posted last week, specifically one regarding sushi (“Have you been to Sushisamba? Is it the best sushi in Reykjavík? Why/why not?”), one of our FB friends wrote the following: “This is getting quite boring. I remember the days when RG was full of interesting articles on social issues

Show Me More!