A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.
Free Pink Street Boys Album! Free Editorial! Free Love!

Free Pink Street Boys Album! Free Editorial! Free Love!

Editorial In Chief

Published August 29, 2014

Here is a short editorial, inspired by the late, great Bill Gates and his vision, which continues to warm our hearts and our thighs through our pockets, via sturdy, glowing Gorilla Glass:

Here’s to the volcanos. The eruptions. The shaking moneymakers. The ones who remind the world that, yes, we exist. While some may see them as extremely dangerous and not to be trifled with, we see them as tremendous opportunities for market expansion, advanced brand awareness building and vast merchandizing profits.

Because the people who are arrogant enough to shamelessly exploit potentially catastrophic events, are the ones who make bank.

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

PSB4

Here is a review of Pink Street Boys’ cassette-exclusive release, which is called Trash From The Boys:

Trash From The Boys is the best Icelandic album I have heard for a long time. It might be the best Icelandic album ever made. That might well be. I don’t know.

Like a 21st century version of a younger, angrier, hungrier, dirtier, perverser, more cynical, more poisonus, more self-destructiverer version of that band Singapore Sling (I really miss Singapore Sling), Pink Street Boys provide a perfect and, frankly, much-needed antidote to all that hey! business that’s been contaminating our airwaves of late.

This is neither wholesome nor pretty. I haven’t been able to discern any lyrics, but I’m fairly certain they’ll prove kind of dumb and exciting. The band themselves don’t come off as particularly handsome or smart. I’m not sure they’re great at playing their instruments. I love them. I love their album.

They’re just what Reykjavík, needs.

Thank you, Pink Street Boys.

Download the album here.


Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of The Issue: Boogie Trouble’s “Augnablik”

by

Disco-infused Boogie Trouble are back in action after a year-long hiatus and are getting ready to release their debut album. Their first single off the album, “Augnablik,” features a simple melody and a clean arrangement reminiscent of the ‘70s. The lyrics are about the search for true love with all the uncertainties involved, and the band even breaks out love’s truest instrument, the saxophone, for a dramatic solo. If it weren’t for singer Klara Arnald’s cheerful voice and the upbeat vibe of the song, we’d be sobbing in a corner over the futility of life and love. Give the song

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

You Probably Just Want To Read About The Eruption, Huh?

by

The biggest news from Iceland these days is undoubtedly the eruption. Of course it’s not everyday that a volcano erupts. But it’s hardly a once-in-a-lifetime event either. Holuhraun is actually the fourth Icelandic volcano to erupt in the last four years, and it’s been hurling lava for nearly a month now. Sprawled across three seats on a half-empty flight back to Iceland shortly after the latest eruption began, I found myself wondering if it was an unusually slow day for travel or if the eruption was scaring people off. The Eyjafjallajökull eruption certainly showed the world that our volcanoes are

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Track Of The Issue: Sindri Eldon – “Honeydew”

by

If garage rock from the mid-90s is your kind of thing, then you, my friend, are going to love Sindri Eldon. Although the artist may be in his late twenties, he channels his inner cynical teenage self through his music, as can be clearly heard in “Honeydew.” The lyrics focus on a quintessential teenage problem: whether to make someone feel better by saying you love them when you don’t. The sound may be garage-y, but the arrangement is anything but sloppy, as the ever-so-slightly lazy bass, lightly distorted guitars and snappy drums all get a chance to shine before coming

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Halló, I’m Back!

by

I went on a vacation last month. It was wonderful. I left the country. I spent very little time sitting behind a computer. I stopped following Icelandic news. I browsed our website and Facebook a few times. It was really wonderful. I tuned out (and all but turned on, tuned in, dropped out). To say that nothing much happened while I was gone would be an understatement. The Icelandic media seems to be in shambles (turn to page 16 for the scoop on that). The office ate Thai food last print week (we usually subsist on burgers and pizza). They

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

I CHOOSE TREASON

by

I just signed up to become a founding member of Fylkisflokkurinn (“The County-Party”), which has the stated purpose and sole platform of campaigning for Iceland to re-join Norway and become its twentieth county. I was the 573rd Icelander to do so according to the would-be political party’s website (fylkisflokkurinn.is), while the Facebook group that launched it currently lists over 4,600 members (many of them very enthusiastic!) and counting. Proponents of Iceland’s independence might call me a traitor to the country that bore me—they might even go so far as to accuse me of treason. And I won’t lie: I felt

Mag
Editorial
<?php the_title(); ?>

Free Track: Prins Póló’s “París Norðursins”

by and

You won’t find Prins Póló’s unexpected summer hit “París norðursins” (“Paris Of The North”) on the act’s recent LP ‘Sorrí’ (‘Sorry’). Written and recorded specifically for the purpose, the song features in a highly anticipated film of the same name, which hits theatres in early September and should be pretty great if the Prince’s contribution is anything to go by. The track’s steadily humming, upbeat bass line is accompanied with occasional keys and distorted guitar segments, all wrapped up in a fun and danceable package. Hiding behind that cheerful façade are lyrics that explore a recurring bitter theme in Icelandic

Show Me More!