My Colours, My Honour

My Colours, My Honour

Published February 20, 2009

Former Grapevine Editor Valur Gunnarsson explains the colour schemes he employs in his piece on the Rainbow Revolution, and why he calls it that.

Red: Usually denotes Socialists, who have their own party, Rauður vettvangur. Though few in numbers, they have large flags that have been very apparent at the Saturday protests. Can also indicate the current Red-Green coalition, though this does not include the hard-core socialists.

Green: Here, as elsewhere, green indicates nature conservationists. Although Greens as such were not very apparent in the recent revolution, many protesters, particularly anarchists, first cut their chops protesting against the Kárahnjúkar dam. Green is also used by current government party The Left-Greens.

Blue: Traditionally the colour of Royalty, here the party colour of the Independence Party. Those that wore blue armbands during the protests were not, however, IP members, but off duty policemen who had cut their old police shirts into ribbons. They were mainly protesting against violence.

Black: The anarchists wave black flags and also, for the most part, wear black clothes, covering their faces with hoods. The anarchists not only want to change the government, but to do away with it completely. Their latest ploy to that end is to lie to polltakers, and hence disrupt the system from within.

White: On the evening of January 23rd, white strings had been tied to every lamppost downtown. What this indicated became apparent the next day, when a group called Nýtt lýðveldi (New Republic) announced its existence at the Saturday protests. The group demands an extra-Parliamentary government and a new constitution. Some of their demands have been met, as two of the new Ministers are non-political experts, and a new constitution is set to be written this year.

Pink: Used by feminists, in this case The Women’s Emergency Government. For a while, even the statue of founding father Jón Sigurðsson was spotted wearing pink. The 500 krónur. bill that bears his mug is, after all, pink-ish. The WEG wanted an extra-parliamentary government, made up of as many women as men. The current government actually abides by this demand. The WEG officially became a political party on January 29th, and will, ironically enough, run against the country’s first female Prime Minister. Writer Hallgrímur Helgason is a fan. Pink is also used by gays, for example on the cover of protest organiser Hörður Torfason’s new biography.

Orange: Those who want to overthrow the government by non-violent means, such as banging on pots and pans. Taken by some to mean simply being against violence. Why Orange? This was not a reference to the Orange Revolution in the Ukraine, much less Holland or Protestants in Northern Ireland. Orange was initially meant to be the colour of a website run by the grassroots movements who have their headquarters on Borgartún. Why? “Because all the other colours are taken,” said one of the arrangers.

Yellow and Brown: Perhaps you should watch Reservoir Dogs again, to see why those two colours remain unpopular when colour coding.


Mag
Articles
Pagan Christmas

Pagan Christmas

by

The idea of throwing a big celebration in honour of the birth of Christ is a relatively recent idea. Nobody knows exactly when he was born; guesses range from 7 to 2 BC and the date is a mystery. His date of birth was once estimated to be January 6, in an attempt to beat a competing holiday (the celebration of the virgin birth of Aion, the Hellenistic deity of eternity). In the process they borrowed the symbolism of the stables. Christianity is in the business of mergers and acquisitions. The date was later changed to December 25, partly because

Mag
Articles
The Encyclopaedia of Icelandic Holidays

The Encyclopaedia of Icelandic Holidays

by

Aðfangadagur (Ath-founga-dager) December 24, Aðfangadagur, is the day Icelanders celebrate Christmas (as opposed to December 25 in most countries). The first half of the day usually goes towards finishing off all of the last-minute preparations, making food, wrapping presents, bathing and putting on nice clothes. Children are often occupied by the television set, as most stations broadcast a non-stop programme of cartoons throughout the day. Six o’ clock marks the official start of Christmas in Iceland, marked by state radio broadcasting the traditional “ringing of the church bells.” This is when most households sit down to enjoy a pleasant holiday

Mag
Articles
WAR ON CHRISTMAS: Finally, An Icelandic Front

WAR ON CHRISTMAS: Finally, An Icelandic Front

by

Anyone who’s followed American politics, or switched to Fox News over the holidays, knows that a full blown war is raging at this very moment: The War On Christmas. On the battlefield, the godless forces of Politically Correct liberals—who want to take Christ out of Christmas and thus destroy the very fabric of American culture—fight the patriotic and pious people over at Fox. Of course nobody residing the reality-based community has ever encountered this “War on Christmas.” It exists only in the fevered imagination of loudmouths like Bill O’Reilly and Rush Limbaugh, who use it to fill airtime, drum up

Mag
Articles
Wanted: The Icelandic Christmas Mood

Wanted: The Icelandic Christmas Mood

by

When they stop stacking the Rjómi (heavy cream) neatly on the supermarket shelves, you know Christmas is just around the corner. The Rjómi hasn’t disappeared though. Entering the walk-in cooler (don’t forget your jacket!) you’ll see a huge container spilling over with cartons and cartons of Rjómi. Frankly, stacking it is a waste of time; soon you’ll notice the mountain getting smaller as every single person takes at least one, maybe two or maybe five. Our consumer needs are this predictable before, during and after Christmas, because almost every single Icelandic household has the exact same family traditions. This uniformity

Mag
Articles
The Sinister Christmas Clan Of Iceland

The Sinister Christmas Clan Of Iceland

by and

In Iceland, there is no Santa Claus. Instead, there are thirteen “jólasveinar,” which can be translated to “Yule Lads.” They live in mountains and hike to town, one by one, for the thirteen days leading up to Christmas Eve. Their mother is Grýla, a troll known for eating babies and beating up her husband. In previous centuries, the Yule Lads were a bunch of scraggly, merry—sometimes thieving—pranksters that would get up to all sorts of shenanigans on their visits to civilization. In recent decades, the lads have mostly abandoned their mischievous ways—today’s youth mostly knows them as a group of

Mag
Articles
Preparing for Global Leadership

Preparing for Global Leadership

by

In 2012, Þóra Arnórsdóttir, a respected journalist for Icelandic State TV, RÚV, launched a formidable campaign for the presidency of Iceland, challenging the four-term incumbent Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson. Although many recession-weary Icelanders were eager to see a change of executive power at the time, Þóra’s entrance into presidential politics drew surprisingly intense public scrutiny for an unusual reason: she was eight months pregnant with her third child when she formally entered the race. Her bold decision to campaign while pregnant generated a slew of laudatory and skeptical headlines in Iceland and across the globe, for many media outlets questioned the

Show Me More!