A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
Culture
Live Reviews
A Powerhouse Climax With Four Songs!

A Powerhouse Climax With Four Songs!

Words by

Published August 10, 2012

Nine o’clock on a summer night is just about dinner time for many Icelanders, which could very well explain how shockingly (or maybe not so shockingly) sparsely populated Iðnó was for the first act: Just Another Snake Cult.  There was a mixed bag of folks, ranging from grandparents to tourists. Composed of eight members, the nearly genre-less band has been described as ‘freak pop,’ focusing more on the ambivalent sounds of the keys and sax rather than a steady drum beat (freaky!).
Ásgeir Trausti was next to claim the stage, followed by Lay Low, and by the end of this third act the audience had increased by six fold. Both acoustic acts inspired a group of sentimental-looking younger folk to sit in a semi-circle in the foreground and copious amounts of swaying in the background. Couples were especially highlighted during these moments. Both executed rather formulaic performances with their agreeably soothing voices and soft energy as the main attraction. However, the drummer for Lay Low delivered some incredible solo bits that were way too far and few between.
Moses Hightower’s performance continued the “hotel lobby chillin” feeling or rather the “shopping at Anthropologie on a Tuesday” vibe. However, this band does Icelandic lounge quite well and brought the swaying to the next level whilst playing their biggest hit “Stutt skref” (“Short Steps”).
After what seemed like a four-part opening act, Þú og ég took the stage with a vengeance. I didn’t see it coming, but they delivered a powerhouse performance with only four songs! This late seventies disco band had every person singing aloud, clapping, groovin’, pulling at, what seemed like, basically everyone’s heartstrings. The audience was a perfect reflection of the pop stars’ execution—a cathartic release of pent-up excitement that had been building for what seemed like decades (maybe it actually was in their case?). They provided the climax of the night, as Tilbury maintained the fervor to the evening’s end with a synthpop dance routine. Overall, a success, and it really was oh so sweet.

The Grapevine also reviewed Innipúkinn’s festivities on Friday and Sunday.



Culture
Live Reviews
<?php the_title(); ?>

Justin Timberlake, A Review

by

Eight million sweating preteens were packed into Kórinn Sports Hall in Kópavogur on Sunday, August 24, all for one purpose: Justin Timberlake. Also in attendance were those who were alive to have experienced him firsthand in his original incarnation as a tortured child artist on Disney’s ‘Mickey Mouse Club,’ and then for his subsequent reinvention as the only member of ‘N SYNC anyone cared about. Full disclosure: I belong to the latter group. Though it was very dark and full of expensive yet paradoxically cheap beer, the night I finally saw Justin Timberlake perform live in concert was young and

Culture
Live Reviews
<?php the_title(); ?>

A Secret Show In A Secret Place

by

“Hey, you guys want to come to my show this Thursday? I can put you on the list.” This was the secret password to score entry into a Sofar Sounds secret show, which I attended last night at a University of Iceland dorm with some fellow Grapevine interns. Sofar Sounds is a music discovery community in the form of a secret club that puts on small, intimate shows all over the world. They’re invite only and usually held in the living room of someone who has volunteered to host, sort of like Airbnb for performances. Getting to this performance felt

Culture
Live Reviews
<?php the_title(); ?>

Low Roar Start Off On A High Note

by

What: Low Roar / Mr. Silla When: August 15, 20:30 Where: Tjarnarbíó, Tjarnargötu 12 Admission: 2,000 ISK It began with one of the best album openers I’ve heard this year. Clocking in at over nine minutes when performed live, “Breathe In” slowly builds and builds, harmonies swelling and reverb-soaked drums thumping, before it calmly retreats back from where it came. The song effortlessly evokes serenity—a clearing of the built-up bustle of every day life before the remainder of the album sets off. For me, it conjured up a misty morning at sea, climbing out of the cabin, looking around and,

Culture
Live Reviews
<?php the_title(); ?>

Where Elves Dare Not Tread

by

The first weekend of August is known as Verslunarmannahelgi (“Merchant’s Weekend”), a national holiday that sees numerous festivals taking place around the island, with plenty of drunken debauchery on offer. Scores of folks make their way to festivals such as Vestmannaeyjar’s Þjóðhátíð and Akureyri’s Ein með öllu, to name but two, with a handful of stragglers remaining in Reykjavík to party at Innipúkinn. Given the general popularity of established festivals like the above, any new contenders on the scene face an uphill battle. Norðanpaunk (“Northern Punk”), however, isn’t any ordinary festival—indeed, its debut this year saw it carving a place

Culture
Live Reviews
<?php the_title(); ?>

Some Loudness For Your Living Room

by

When life gives you lemons, you have a wicked house party with live performances! Or, wait, is that what you do when your landlord gives you notice because the house is being turned into (another) 101 hotel? That’s at least what occupants Rósa María and Kría did with their living room on this otherwise ordinary Monday evening. For two hours, the post-punk band Börn and hardcore group Muck entertained 30-40 fans, tenants and passers-by that dared venture inside. The event was advertised on Facebook on Sunday, leaving me sceptical as to exactly how many would show up. But seeing how

Culture
Live Reviews
<?php the_title(); ?>

Testes Not Required For Metal

by

For the rockers and metalheads of Iceland, the second weekend of July is a religious holiday, road trip and family reunion all rolled into one. It marks the annual Eistnaflug festival (“Flight Of The Testes”), held in Iceland’s eastern-most village, Neskaupstaður. During the three days of festivities, the fishing hamlet’s population of 1,437 more than doubles, with crowds flocking from all over Iceland, and to an extent Europe, to witness a line-up of more than 50 local and international metal bands share a stage. Eistnaflug has come a long way from its humble beginnings ten years ago, when only three

Show Me More!