Music
Review
+-

IKI: IKI

Published April 2, 2012

Nine girls walk into a studio and improv for seven hours, using only their voices. What do you get? A 40-minute studio album of improvised a capella. Sounds like a joke, right? No, it’s not. These girls have created a unique album—a brave, wondrous artistic feat that is original in its execution, not to mention its style.
Unfortunately, while the girls have beautiful voices, there are songs on this album that really drag it down. The first song on this album, titled “I Natt, Mens Du Sov,” is extremely difficult to listen to. “The Mermaid and the Sailor” has real potential, but due to the limits of improvisation, such as no rehearsal and/or set lyrics, the song becomes too repetitive. Looking past the repetitiveness of some of these songs, however, the album proves decent.
Still, the idea behind this album is fantastic and IKI cannot be accused of being cliché. So in sum, the album is worth listening to at least once, to appreciate what these artists are attempting. Just skip the first song…
www.myspace.com/ikivocal


Culture
Album review
Rökrétt Framhald

Rökrétt Framhald

by

On Grísalappalísa’s debut album ‘Ali’, there’s a line in “Lóan er komin” where singer Baldur Baldursson growls, “Thoroughly thought out/Much

Culture
Album review
Unortheta

Unortheta

by

‘Unortheta’ is a forty-minute frisson full of looming doom, blasting fury, and cavernous bellows that seem to emanate from the

Culture
Album review
Í Sporum Annara

Í Sporum Annara

by

Logn come screaming through the gates with a vicious noise attack egged on by a pair of voices battling to

Culture
Album review
Rivers & Poems

Rivers & Poems

by

A collaboration between Frosti Jónsson and Japanese ambient drone artist Nobuto Suda, this four-and-a-half track suite falls deeply into the

Culture
Album review
I Got A Feeling

I Got A Feeling

by

The opening track “Like A Bird” is well-named because it really does resemble the output of Mr. Oizo of Flat

Culture
Album review
Apeshedder

Apeshedder

by

Glitchy synths, ambient interludes, and dreamscape pop: that’s ‘Apeshedder’ in a nutshell. What that doesn’t tell us about, of course, is the shimmering flourishes with

Show Me More!