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American Indie

American Indie

Published August 20, 2004

American Indie Days are starting in Háskólabíó on the 25th of August. The opening film will be Supersize Me. If Michael Moore´s Fahreinheit 9-11 shows us the geopolitical effects of mass consumerism, Spurlock shows us its effects in our daily life. Spurlock himself will be present at the premiere.
It will also be a chance to see various other films:
Before Sunset will finally tell us whether Ethan Hawke ever got to be with Julie Delphy, for those of you who have been wondering ever since Before Sunrise.
Bollywood/Hollywood is apparently Pretty Woman done Bollywood style.
Before there was Lost in Translation there was My First Mister, another charming film about an overweight, middle aged man´s lust for a teenager.
Saved is another light comedy about a Christian girl who becomes ostracized by friends and family when she becomes pregnant and her boyfriend is sent to a degayification centre. It´s also the first time since puberty to see MacCaulay Culkin.
Things take a turn for the darker in The Shape of Things, about a quiet man who changes for his girlfriend.
The Friedmans is a documentary about a man accused of abusing his computers students. In Ken Park director Larry Clark makes a sequel of sorts to Kids, and and in Spellbound we follow a group of kids as they attempt to win a spelling competition.
The most mouthwatering prospect of all may be Jim Jarmusch´s collection of short films, Coffee and Cigarettes, starring Tom Waits and Iggy Pop.



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