Culture
Food
THe Kebab House

THe Kebab House

Photos by
Valdís Thor

Published August 1, 2008

I had received both positive and negative comments about the food at The Kebab House before I visited and had therefore no idea exactly what to expect. I took a look at the menu (which includes the western equivalents of the kebab, the cheese-burger and the pizza slice) and settled on a reasonably priced Shish-kebab. After the first bite I was in love.
    It actually tasted like something I would make at home. The meat and vegetables were fresh and I could actually taste them, unlike most other fast food restaurants in Reykjavík where the sauce is so heavily applied that the meal is really just a side course for your sauce. That said, the reason some people dislike the Kebab House is exactly because of the absence of the traditional hearty, hang-over curing sauce. Personally, I know of nothing better than a healthy dose of cholesterol doused over some amalgamation of fried meat and bread, but The Kebab House is good for a completely different reason. It all comes down to a matter of taste. While the clean, hygienic restaurant may not reek of authenticity to some people, others will appreciate being able to get a quick bite without having their intestines and immune systems put to the test.
    The idea of duality has followed mankind since the dawn of time. Every day has its night, every yin has its yang, and the pleasure of over sauced and greasy fast food is inevitably followed by guilt and the risk of nausea.  Some places, such as Pizza Hut, try unsuccessfully to blend the two genres of traditional restaurant and fast food joint but wind up making a compilation of the faults inherent in both – bad food, bad service and long waiting times. The Kebab House, however, is a perfect balance – quick service, great tasting meals and a clear conscience. The Kebab House is a blatant attempt to tip the scales in our favour.  

  • Where: Austurstræti 3 101 Reykjavík Tel.: 534 5720


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