A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again

Stuff We Like!

Published August 19, 2009

For some reason, everyone likes stuff that’s free. Free music, free
journalism, free pornography, free jazz – it’s all universally celebrated as
being all totally awesome and great. And why wouldn’t it be? With things that
are free, you don’t need to commit any of your time and/or resources to
appreciating them. You don’t even need to appreciate them. They’re just…
there. For free.

Now, we just learned that a free web-site has opened up, one that
lists free things you can get up to in Reykjavík. It’s called Free City Travel
and you can access it by typing up www.freecitytravel.com
in your web-browser window. We did, and we learned lots of things.

We learned that the site purports to list everything you can do for
free in Reykjavík (actually, we doubt that. It does not list staring blankly
into space, for instance, when everyone knows that it’s a free, fun and decent
activity). We learned  that most
bars in the area refrain from charging an admittance fee. We learned that there are all sorts of cool attractions and museums and stuff
that you can visit for free.
We learned you can get a free bike tour of Reykjavík.
And that’s pretty awesome.

Read all about the free stuff at www.freecitytravel.com


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