A Grapevine service announcement Take note: Holiday Opening Hours
Win A Date With Frímann Frímannsson!

Win A Date With Frímann Frímannsson!

Words by

Published October 12, 2009

Y’all know him, y’all love him. Here’s your chance to win a four-day date Reykjavík’s premier scenester, the hipster y’all love to love, the one, the only, the  incomparable FRÍMANN FRÍMANNSSON!
 Not only will you get a chance to party down with a local, you’ll get to do it in such a grand fashion that you can pretty much guarantee that your friends will hate you for years to come. But that doesn’t matter. You’ll have Frímann. And the memories. Think of the memories.
 “What are those luxuries you speak of?” you ask? Well. How’s this for starters: You’ll get VIP access passes to Iceland Airwaves. This means that you will never, ever have to wait in line for anything for the duration of the festival. Ever. Want to hop in to NASA for a quick drink, past that 50 strong queue? Go right ahead, sir or madam.
 “That sounds mighty good, Grapevine, but isn’t there more?” you ask? Hell yeah, there’s more. Try this on for size: Every night of Airwaves, you can step in to the very awesome Bakkus for free shots of whatever you desire – and they’ll give you a mighty fine beer discount for the duration of the night. This is of course perfect for all your aftershow drinking needs.
 Want more? You got it. When you wake up each day, you can skip along to Kaffibarinn for a free dose of their time tested, alcoholic-tried, 100% guaranteed hangover killer combos.
 You will also get a Reykjavík City Pass, courtesy of the City of Reykjavík. This allows free admittance to all the city’s fine pools, free bus rides, free museum admittance and discounts at select stores and venues. Hell yeah.
 Not only that, but you will have the infamous partymonster Frímann Frímannsson to guide you through the wastelands of 101 nightlife and partying. For the whole weekend, Frímann will be at your service, ready to escort you around to the hottest gigs, parties and debauched after hour hot-tubbing sessions around. And that guy knows how to party.
 Who’s Frímann Frímannsson? Well, Frímann Frímannsson has without any doubt whatsoever been 101 Reykjavík’s kingpin of hard-partyin’, designer-gear wearin’, part-time modellin’ neo-hipsters throughout 2009. Also, he’s just plain nice, that guy, so following him around should greatly enhance your weekend. 
 Oh, and you get to bring a friend, too. This prize is good for two. So you’ll have one friend that won’t abandon you out of resentful envy. Which is comforting.
 So here’s how you win this grand prize to end all grand prizes (oh yes, the runner up will win an exclusive Kimi Records goodie bag!): you must send us a paragraph detailing your most awesome experience, ever (only a paragraph. Anything over 100 words will go directly to the trashbin).

You must send it via e-mail, with the subject: “I <3 Frímann Frímannsson.”
The address is: editor@grapevine.is

You must include your name, age and a telephone number where you can be reached. 
 Lastly, this competition is only open to Airwaves wristband holders that do not permanently reside in Iceland. That is – if you live in Iceland, or if you haven’t bought an Airwaves-ticket, we cannot help you. This competition’s not for you. Sorry. Stop looking. But good luck. 
 The contest is open until Thursday, October 15 at 14:00. We will contact the winner that same day, at 16:00, and give him all those cool goodies. If you won, but cannot be reached – we reserve the right to select another winner.
Winners will be expected to document their festival weekend via a digital camera, phone camera or other such nifty device. Winners agree to being interviewed by a representative of the Reykjavík Grapevine on Airwaves Sunday.
This excellent contest is brought to you by The Reykjavík Grapevine, in cooperation with the following, awesome parties:
Mr. Destiny
The Iceland Airwaves Festival
Kaffibarinn
Bakkus
The City of Reykjavík
Kimi Records

All your submissions are belong to us. And PepsiCo International. Although neither entity will want to use them for anything, probably. By submitting to this contest, you forfeit all your intellectual rights. Period.



Mag
Articles
Dirty Holidaze

Dirty Holidaze

by

December is by far the darkest and spookiest month. It is also the booziest, by far. The overwhelming joy one often associates with the annual Christmas frenzy increases the longing for a nightcap, the fright that correlates with mass expenditures in gifts and other holiday nonsense calls for some alcohol, and when you intend to bid farewell to the passing year you’ll want a bottle of liquor by your side. It seems there’s no avoiding dipping your toes (or your entire foot) into the tantalizing Jacuzzi of holiday vice. For this reason, behold: Grapevine’s guide to your Icelandic holiday binge

Mag
Articles
So What’s This I Keep Hearing About Everything Being Terrible in Iceland?

So What’s This I Keep Hearing About Everything Being Terrible in Iceland?

by

In Mid-November Unnar Steinn Sigtryggsson, an Icelander who goes by the username “askur,” made a comment on popular internet community Reddit. He recounted the major news events of the last few weeks in Iceland. However, unlike most bullet point lists of Icelandic news stories, this one went viral. Has the news in Iceland been unusually full of kittens licking baby turtles? More like political scandals, strikes, vermin infestations, protests, police behaving badly, and economic mismanagement. To an audience used to hearing stories about how wonderfully Iceland had dealt with the 2008 financial crisis, this was indeed newsworthy. Hold on a

Mag
Articles
Pagan Christmas

Pagan Christmas

by

The idea of throwing a big celebration in honour of the birth of Christ is a relatively recent idea. Nobody knows exactly when he was born; guesses range from 7 to 2 BC and the date is a mystery. His date of birth was once estimated to be January 6, in an attempt to beat a competing holiday (the celebration of the virgin birth of Aion, the Hellenistic deity of eternity). In the process they borrowed the symbolism of the stables. Christianity is in the business of mergers and acquisitions. The date was later changed to December 25, partly because

Mag
Articles
The Encyclopaedia of Icelandic Holidays

The Encyclopaedia of Icelandic Holidays

by

Aðfangadagur (Ath-founga-dager) December 24, Aðfangadagur, is the day Icelanders celebrate Christmas (as opposed to December 25 in most countries). The first half of the day usually goes towards finishing off all of the last-minute preparations, making food, wrapping presents, bathing and putting on nice clothes. Children are often occupied by the television set, as most stations broadcast a non-stop programme of cartoons throughout the day. Six o’ clock marks the official start of Christmas in Iceland, marked by state radio broadcasting the traditional “ringing of the church bells.” This is when most households sit down to enjoy a pleasant holiday

Mag
Articles
WAR ON CHRISTMAS: Finally, An Icelandic Front

WAR ON CHRISTMAS: Finally, An Icelandic Front

by

Anyone who’s followed American politics, or switched to Fox News over the holidays, knows that a full blown war is raging at this very moment: The War On Christmas. On the battlefield, the godless forces of Politically Correct liberals—who want to take Christ out of Christmas and thus destroy the very fabric of American culture—fight the patriotic and pious people over at Fox. Of course nobody residing the reality-based community has ever encountered this “War on Christmas.” It exists only in the fevered imagination of loudmouths like Bill O’Reilly and Rush Limbaugh, who use it to fill airtime, drum up

Mag
Articles
Wanted: The Icelandic Christmas Mood

Wanted: The Icelandic Christmas Mood

by

When they stop stacking the Rjómi (heavy cream) neatly on the supermarket shelves, you know Christmas is just around the corner. The Rjómi hasn’t disappeared though. Entering the walk-in cooler (don’t forget your jacket!) you’ll see a huge container spilling over with cartons and cartons of Rjómi. Frankly, stacking it is a waste of time; soon you’ll notice the mountain getting smaller as every single person takes at least one, maybe two or maybe five. Our consumer needs are this predictable before, during and after Christmas, because almost every single Icelandic household has the exact same family traditions. This uniformity

Show Me More!