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Win A Date With Frímann Frímannsson!

Win A Date With Frímann Frímannsson!

Words by

Published October 12, 2009

Y’all know him, y’all love him. Here’s your chance to win a four-day date Reykjavík’s premier scenester, the hipster y’all love to love, the one, the only, the  incomparable FRÍMANN FRÍMANNSSON!
 Not only will you get a chance to party down with a local, you’ll get to do it in such a grand fashion that you can pretty much guarantee that your friends will hate you for years to come. But that doesn’t matter. You’ll have Frímann. And the memories. Think of the memories.
 “What are those luxuries you speak of?” you ask? Well. How’s this for starters: You’ll get VIP access passes to Iceland Airwaves. This means that you will never, ever have to wait in line for anything for the duration of the festival. Ever. Want to hop in to NASA for a quick drink, past that 50 strong queue? Go right ahead, sir or madam.
 “That sounds mighty good, Grapevine, but isn’t there more?” you ask? Hell yeah, there’s more. Try this on for size: Every night of Airwaves, you can step in to the very awesome Bakkus for free shots of whatever you desire – and they’ll give you a mighty fine beer discount for the duration of the night. This is of course perfect for all your aftershow drinking needs.
 Want more? You got it. When you wake up each day, you can skip along to Kaffibarinn for a free dose of their time tested, alcoholic-tried, 100% guaranteed hangover killer combos.
 You will also get a Reykjavík City Pass, courtesy of the City of Reykjavík. This allows free admittance to all the city’s fine pools, free bus rides, free museum admittance and discounts at select stores and venues. Hell yeah.
 Not only that, but you will have the infamous partymonster Frímann Frímannsson to guide you through the wastelands of 101 nightlife and partying. For the whole weekend, Frímann will be at your service, ready to escort you around to the hottest gigs, parties and debauched after hour hot-tubbing sessions around. And that guy knows how to party.
 Who’s Frímann Frímannsson? Well, Frímann Frímannsson has without any doubt whatsoever been 101 Reykjavík’s kingpin of hard-partyin’, designer-gear wearin’, part-time modellin’ neo-hipsters throughout 2009. Also, he’s just plain nice, that guy, so following him around should greatly enhance your weekend. 
 Oh, and you get to bring a friend, too. This prize is good for two. So you’ll have one friend that won’t abandon you out of resentful envy. Which is comforting.
 So here’s how you win this grand prize to end all grand prizes (oh yes, the runner up will win an exclusive Kimi Records goodie bag!): you must send us a paragraph detailing your most awesome experience, ever (only a paragraph. Anything over 100 words will go directly to the trashbin).

You must send it via e-mail, with the subject: “I <3 Frímann Frímannsson.”
The address is: editor@grapevine.is

You must include your name, age and a telephone number where you can be reached. 
 Lastly, this competition is only open to Airwaves wristband holders that do not permanently reside in Iceland. That is – if you live in Iceland, or if you haven’t bought an Airwaves-ticket, we cannot help you. This competition’s not for you. Sorry. Stop looking. But good luck. 
 The contest is open until Thursday, October 15 at 14:00. We will contact the winner that same day, at 16:00, and give him all those cool goodies. If you won, but cannot be reached – we reserve the right to select another winner.
Winners will be expected to document their festival weekend via a digital camera, phone camera or other such nifty device. Winners agree to being interviewed by a representative of the Reykjavík Grapevine on Airwaves Sunday.
This excellent contest is brought to you by The Reykjavík Grapevine, in cooperation with the following, awesome parties:
Mr. Destiny
The Iceland Airwaves Festival
Kaffibarinn
Bakkus
The City of Reykjavík
Kimi Records

All your submissions are belong to us. And PepsiCo International. Although neither entity will want to use them for anything, probably. By submitting to this contest, you forfeit all your intellectual rights. Period.



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