Culture
Food
HORST TAPAS

HORST TAPAS

Published August 20, 2004

On a hot and sultry day like this it is particularly appropriate to enjoy a round of Tapas. The only restaurant in Reykjavik specialising in this Spanish culinary delight is Tapas Bar, located in the cellar of Vesturgata 3b. The central location makes it an ideal place to visit after spending a sunny afternoon in Austurvöllur, which is exactly what Grapevine did on this hot August evening. We elected to sit outside, although a decidedly un-Spanish evening gust was starting to make its presence felt in downtown Reykjavík. Being young, adventurous and obese, we decided to select the chef’s choice of a large selection of small dishes. We didn’t have to wait very long before the dishes began to arrive, one by one. Among the delicious and often exotic-looking delicacies on offer were scallops, baked salted cod (the strongest economic and culinary link between Spain and Iceland), almond roasted trout with bananas, meatballs with romesco sauce, grilled pork and roasted crabs (delicious, although for the editor they brought back uncomfortable memories of his unfortunate bout with crab lice in the late 90’s)(not true, I didn´t even get to have sex in the late 90´s –ed.). The spices and sauces were savoury, but always played Garfunkel to the main ingredients’ Simon.
For dessert we had the most exotic item we could find on the menu: Baked goat cheese with jam, honey and crisp bread. We were not quite sure what to do with the honey but the goat cheese was delicious, although its taste was a little too reminiscent of the smell in the goat shack in the Reykjavik farm animal zoo. Perhaps a bit like having sex with someone who reminds you of a close relative.
While we ate, we discussed the effects of weather on national character and the Icelandic national character in particular. Our waiter, who turned out to be Portuguese, had various things to say on the matter. Icelanders, he said, are willing to accept any indignity from their government, but if they get cold coffee with their dessert they demand loudly to get the whole meal for free. We couldn’t help but be a little concerned for him, as he chatted with us for several minutes outside in the evening breeze while holding a half-full pot of cooling and potentially rampage-inducing coffee. However, no cold coffee frenzies resulted that particular evening. Perhaps it will be safe to give us beer coolers. Any year now.



Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

New Nordic Cuisine Is Dead

by

My lifelong hatred of dill makes me a terrible champion of New Nordic cuisine. At age seven I swore to my mom I would try my best to eradicate the herb—and now I find myself in a restaurant named after that noxious weed. My skin may be the colour of cauliflower soup, but my taste buds are bulgur brown. It hasn’t helped that the Icelandic food scene has mostly embraced the parts of New Nordic cuisine that suited our aims (reaffirming patriotism and separating tourists from their money) but left out the tricky bits, like carefully sourcing and foraging your

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

The Icelandic Restaurant Name Listicle

by

Before you can name your child in Iceland, you have to run the name by the highly conservative Icelandic Naming Committee. But that’s where the micromanaging stops. You can name your farm Saurbær (“Shitville”), name your horse Hátíð (“Festival”), and name your streets Barmahlíð (“Bosom Hill”) or Völundarhús (“Labyrinth”). Bar and restaurant names are no exception. Here’s an easy-to-digest overview of some of the best and worst of Icelandic restaurant names, inspired by a Buzzfeed listicle we read called “Top 5 Reasons For Top 5 Lists.” Top 5 Questionable Bar/Restaurant Names 5. Harlem It’s closed now, and it was good

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Virus In Imported Meat Might Alter Nation’s Behavior, Warns PM

by

According to Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson, a virus that may change people’s behavioral patterns is common among most of the world’s populations, except Iceland, Norway, and, ‘remarkably’, the UK. Sigmundur Davíð admits that this does indeed sound like science fiction, adding ‘but …’, seemingly to imply that reality may prove stranger than fiction. He indicated that this should be kept in mind when shaping agricultural policy, emphasizing as ‘extremely important’ that ‘we remain free of all sorts of infections which are, unfortunately, all to common in very many places’. ‘Might Be Changing The Behavior Of Whole Nations’ ‘Because this

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Grilled Meat In The Summer Rain

by

Kol was somewhat of a puzzle to me: a restaurant that opened its doors early this year to some acclaim, but hasn’t yet reached its full commercial potential—or so I thought. My companion and I graced Kol with our presence on a busy Friday evening. Every seat was filled with people who seemed ready to put the endless summer rain out of their minds by consuming grilled food… and cocktails. Lots of cocktails. Kol is brilliantly situated near the top of Skólavörðustígur, a short distance from Hallgrímskirkja church. The place is designed pretty much like every other new eating establishment

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

Great Grandma’s Recipe, With a Kick

by

Sceptics of Jungian psychology take note: the collective unconscious is most certainly A Thing here in Iceland. How’s that, you wonder? There are lots of good examples, such as the quickly passé, but briefly passionate fad for Tex-Mex-themed confirmation parties. But more to the point, consider the emergence of Reykjavík’s food truck culture. Less than six months ago, it didn’t really exist in Iceland. And then, practically overnight, a handful of carts suddenly blossomed around town, with two of them selling kjötsúpa, or Icelandic meat soup, as their premier item. Having opened in May (slightly beforeits kjötsúpa-serving cousinSúpuvagninn), Farmer’s Soup

Culture
Food
<?php the_title(); ?>

ATTN! Brennivín Models Wanted!

by

Iceland’s signature spirit needs you! They’re looking for six models, aspiring models, or people who just like to have their picture taken, ages 18-35, for a photo shoot at a downtown Reykjavik bar, this coming Monday July 7. In return, you will get a Brennivín t-shirt, lunch and a beer….and you’ll be featured on the Brennivin.com website. You can send a pic and a little about yourself to: info@brennivinamerica.com    

Show Me More!