There’s Gold In Them Hills

Published February 28, 2013

Drilling in the Þormóðsdal area of Mosfellsbær has long suggested that there is gold in the ground, but a recent re-analysis of the quantity shows that the area may be richer in the precious metal than previously believed.
The estimated quantity of gold per tonne of rock was thought to be just 100 grams, but new tests have revealed that 400 grams of gold per tonne of rock is more likely, mbl.is reports.
Director of the Innovation Center Iceland, Þorsteinn Ingi Sigfússon, will be discussing the prevalence of gold in Iceland’s geothermal rocks at the Center’s annual meeting tomorrow. Meanwhile, British experts reviewing the new data and the distribution of gold in the region will explore the idea of pursuing gold production operations.



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