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Airwaves
Mínus Are LEGENDary …and so are Esja, for that matter

Mínus Are LEGENDary …and so are Esja, for that matter

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Published October 16, 2010

You all know Krummi from his epic ventures with the rock band Mínus. If you don’t, go right now and read up on Mínus and their adventures. Listen to their music. Watch clips of them playing on YouTube. You will find, as others have found before you, that Mínus are without doubt one of the greatest things Iceland has produced in the last two decades. There’s just something there! And it’s great!
Now, after all your research, you will know that Krummi sings with the groundbreaking (and dare we say classic) Icelandic act Mínus. But you maybe don’t know that he also has two other musical projects going on; the rootsy Americana act Esja and the electro Europeana (that’s a word?) act LEGEND. Check both of them out too, for Krummi is a talent, and most things he touches turn to musical gold.
Also, read his answers to our questions. They are rather literate!
Who are you? What can we expect from your Airwaves appearance, and what can we expect of you in general?
I’m an Icelandic musician/artist who plays in different bands, like Mínus, Esja and my new pet project LEGEND, who are playing at Airwaves for the first time this year. You can expect only new material from Mínus. We have just finished our fifth studio album with our new and improved line up, so this will be very exciting for us and hopefully for others as well. The Legend show at the airwaves will be something different, so come and see. I always do my art with my heart in my hands.
What are some of the acts you want to see at this festival, and why?
I’m pretty excited seeing Hercules And Love Affair and Toro Y Moi, and hopefully I will walk into a club where a fairly unknown Icelandic band is playing and I’m loving it.
Are there any acts missing from the bill that you’d like to see on there?
Well the friends-of-Iceland in Killing Joke just released a new album so it would have been great to see them play here but I think this year’s festival is fully booked with great acts.
Wow. There are, like, one million ‘international’ acts on this year’s schedule. Have you heard of any of them? Are you excited to see any of them?  Do you believe this changes anything for the festival in general, and its spirit?
I don’t know many of them or heard much of it but I am excited to see some of them of course. Let’s just hope I have time and energy to see more than 2-3 acts over the whole festival. I think it brings in new spirits for the festivalgoers and artists, so it’s good karma.
Looking back, do you have a favourite edition of Iceland Airwaves? And if so, why?
I loved it when it was in an airplane hangar, and when The Flaming Lips played.
It was very new and exciting for young bands at the time to play a music festival with international acts. Give you an opportunity to get to know other artists from another country and form a bond. It is necessary, and the experience is wonderful.
A lot of our readers are first time Airwaves-visitors. Do you have any tips for them? What to see, what to do, what to avoid, etc? Where to buy records? Or a good place to grab a bite or get away from it all for a while?
Well first and foremost be in a good mood and smile at your fellow man standing next to you. Go see as much of the Icelandic acts as possible and go to art galleries around Reykjavík town. Try the outdoor swimming pools. You should avoid being an asshole. There are a lot of good places to eat down town so just take a walk and you’ll find a great place to grab a bite to eat for sure, and don’t spend too much money on food. Cheap is good. You should go and buy some vinyl at the Smekkleysa record store and Geisladiskabúð Valda and Lucky Records. Buy some Icelandic music and support the scene.
Given that most Airwaves-visitors won’t have a lot of time in their schedule to see the Icelandic countryside, are there any nature-havens close by that you’d recommend?
I recommend renting a bicycle and cycling around Seltjarnanes stopping at the lighthouse at Grótta to bask in the ambiance. And it’s nice riding close to the Icelandic shore. I also strongly recommend hiking up the mountain Keilir if you have time and stamina. It’s real good if you’re hung over.
Has a lot changed in the Icelandic music scene since Airwaves 2009? How about Airwaves 2002?
Music comes and goes, as do trends so I really don’t know. I don’t jump on any bandwagon. I guess there are more acts to follow.
Who are your favourite Icelandic acts these days?
Well from the top of my head. I’m really digging the noise soundscape scene with bands like Evil Madness and Reptilicus. And there are some great bands like Klink, Sólstafir, Momentum and Agent Fresco and more. And oh yeas don’t miss Lazyblood and Reykjavík! and don’t miss the Hljóðaklettar night and Weirdcore night and the Jón Jónsson night, wink wink…
A lot of international journalists like to ask: “How has kreppa affected the Icelandic music scene.” Do you think the question is valid? Do you have a preferred way of answering it?

I would rather not go into it right now but I think it has made the Icelandic musicians and artists more militant and prolific. Well, I hope so and I kind of feel it around me and in myself.
Anything else?
Come and hear and see me play with my best friends on Friday with Legend and on Saturday with Mínus, who will be showcasing exclusively new music of our upcoming album. Be beautiful on the inside.
Watch Mínus’ video for ‘The Long Face’!
Watch Esja perform ‘Hit It’
Mínus plays tonight, Saturday 01:50, at Sódóma
Sorry…Legend played last night, Friday 21:00, at Apótekið


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