Culture
Airwaves
You Need To See Go Go Darkness

You Need To See Go Go Darkness

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Published October 14, 2010

The Go-Go Darkness are a creative vehicle for the combined forces of Singapore Sling mastermind Henrik Björnsson and his spouse, the lovely Elsa María Blöndal. Together as Go Go Darkness, they wrote, recorded and self-released their very excellent eponymous début last year. This year, they’ll be performing at Iceland Airwaves for the first time.
You need to go see them, for they are great (and probably the only non-Vandelles band on the bill that’s fit to sate everyone’s thirst for more Singapore Sling, who are strangely absent from Airwaves 2010). Read these tips and tricks from the duo to get you prepared. 

Who are you? What can we expect from your Airwaves appearance, and what can we expect of you in general?  
The Go-Go Darkness. This is our premier show at the Airwaves. We’ll be playing songs from our record. It’s been floating in the air for a while so it will be good to throw it out there, live. You can expect more music, as we don’t really have time to waste.
What are some of the acts you want to see at this festival, and why? 
Apparat Organ Quartet: One of our all-time favourite bands who we haven’t seen for a long, long time. Evil Madness: The best music project there is in Iceland, simple as that. Skelkur í Bringu: We saw them many months ago and they were great. The Vandelles: What we have heard sounds kick ass. Bang Gang: Another favourite artist and the live band are great.
Are there any acts missing from the bill that you’d like to see on there?
Guess we’ll have to see Kid Twist some other time.
Wow. There are, like, one million ‘international’ acts on this year’s schedule. Have you heard of any of them? Are you excited to see any of them? 
The Vandelles. Yes we are excited to see them. Don’t believe this will change anything. Guess we shall see. Don’t think it changes the spirit, if it does then it’s happening in a good way. We don’t really follow up on what’s happening at all so we don’t know any of the bands except for The Vandelles who we are excited to see.
 A lot of our readers are first time Airwaves-visitors.
Do you have any tips for them? What to see, what to do, what to avoid, etc? Where to buy records? Or a good place to grab a bite or get away from it all for a while?
Dried fish and Brennivín. Go to Einar Jónsson’s Museum. There are also some nice art shows at Gallery Crymo and Kling&Bang. Swimming pools all around town. 12 Tónar, Smekkleysa and Havarí are all good independent record shops. Icelandic Fish & Chips is a good place to eat, the Guinness is good at Celtic Cross or and Danski Barinn good for drinks. We are anti social so we don’t get too caught up in the fashionised Icelandic happenings. If everyone says something is good, it isn’t, so avoid it.

Given that most Airwaves-visitors won’t have a lot of time in their schedule to see the Icelandic countryside, are there any nature-havens close by that you’d recommend?
Kleifarvatn is close by and the landscape around there is very unique and otherworldly.
Also Þingvellir. If you don’t have time; make time. And Ægisíðan is beautiful too.
Has a lot changed in the Icelandic music scene since Airwaves 2009? How about Airwaves 2002?
We don’t pay attention.
 Who are your favourite Icelandic acts these days?
Evil Madness is one of the best, and they look wonderful. Kid Twist, The Third Sound, Two Step Horror, Blanket of Death are all great.

A lot of international journalists like to ask: “How has kreppa affected the Icelandic music scene.” Do you think the question is valid? Do you have a preferred way of answering it?
We live on Mars so we wouldn’t know. Justice for all.
Read our full interview with Go-Go Darkness and Singapore Sling mastermind Henrik Björnsson from earlier this year:

http://www.grapevine.is/Music/ReadArticle/Reykjavik-Needs-Henrik-Bjornsson-And-His-Music
WATCH: Go-Go Darkness’ video for ‘It’s Just That Song’:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jghbdSpQ5fQ
The Go-Go Darkness are playing tonight, Thursday 22:00 at Amsterdam.


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