Processions - The Reykjavik Grapevine

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Daníel Bjarnason

Processions

Classical Apocalypse anyone?

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Published June 4, 2010

It would be nigh on impossible to describe the complexities of Daníel Bjarnason’s debut album in 150 words, but suffice it to say it´s pretty powerful stuff. Processions may be a classical composition, but there also seems to be some rock and electronica DNA running through its sinews. From the layered tracks and dubbing on Bow to String to the use of rock’s quiet, Loud, quiet, LOUD! song structure that is prevalent throughout the album.

The manifesto of Processions is that of restless danger. The brutal cello attacks of the first section, Sorrow Conquers Happiness, evoke the impression of being chased by unknown creatures of the night (and alas being caught). Red-Handed, with its thundering rhythm and stabbing piano percussion, could easily portray the bloody climax of a horror movie, while Skelja surveys the aftermath of said climax.

That’s not to say that this album is nasty and vicious. The quiet sections of the compositions are contemplative. But in going straight for the jugular, Daníel has shown more power and daring than what you’d expect to see from more popular genres of music.


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