Let Them Eat Lobster & Stuff

York Underwood Signe Smala Jóhanna Pétursdóttir
Photos by
Art Bicnick

Published November 29, 2016

Verbúð 11
(Lobster & Stuff)

Geirsgata 3, 101 Reykjavík
Mon-Sun 11:30 - 01:00
What we think
Relaxed but impressive.
Flavour
Lobster/Langoustine
Ambiance
Harbour chic with some subtle glamour
Service
Knowledgable and prepared
Price for 2
12000 ISK - 15000 ISK

It’s technically langoustine, not lobster, but Langoustine & Stuff doesn’t sound right. It misses the fricative soft rhyme of “ster” and “stuff.” That’s the type of linguistic gymnastics marketing wordsmiths simply die for–and, if their product is a living creature, it’s what they kill for too. Langoustine is the Kim Kardashian of expensive sea-insects, desirable mostly for its posterior and being freakishly small. Unlike Kim Kardashian, however, langoustine is small because of it’s habitat, the cold waters of the North Atlantic. Also, langoustine has a small or relatively normal-sized head. All this aside, when lobster is mentioned, know in your heart of hearts we are talking about langoustine.

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For starters, the Grapevine dinner crew tried the Taste Of Lobster spread with lobster tempura, spring rolls, mini burgers and lobster soup (3590 ISK). We also tried the Beef Carpaccio With Lobster which is topped with crispy leeks, melon and truffle mayo (3190 ISK). Lobster is typically paired with champagne, or more reasonably, prosecco. What gives Lobster & Stuff a more relaxed feel is the Italian lager, Peroni, they have on tap. It’s light, bubbly and lasts long enough to enjoy your starter and main course.

Before the main courses arrive, we take time to look around. This restaurant is in a great location on the harbour and our server took us upstairs to the 80s themed bar to give us a feel for the whole establishment. It’s all glamour and bench seating. It’s the type of place you go for a drink after work or take a friend to mull over your amazing new start-up idea. Downstairs, where we were seated, it’s a nice combination of cozy, elegant and the good kind of rustic, without the feeling of dusty bookshelves and ancient sofas closing in on you. The space is warm and welcoming, with flickering candle lights, large windows, thick crafted wooden tables, and, hey, even lobster trap chandeliers.

Purists will love the 200 gram Grilled Lobster with coleslaw, crispy small potatoes and garlic mayo (6990 ISK). It’s the only test Lobster & Stuff has to pass. Can they make lobster (again, langoustine)? The answer is yes. The tail meat pulls easily out of its shell and is not overcooked and shredding. It’s exactly what you were thinking when you ordered it, simple and delicious.

The Lobster Sandwich In Brioche Bread (4690 ISK) is their take on the lobster roll. It’s lobster tucked in a hotdog shaped bun with garlic, guacamole, cabbage and oyster mushrooms–accompanied by dipped potatoes and garlic mayo. It’s filling, simple and safe, but too many toppings. You lose the taste of the lobster. Avocado traditionally pairs well with crab, but the lobster here doesn’t have the aromatic power to contend with guacamole. If it were up to us, it would be simplified down to mostly lobster, butter and regular  mayonnaise on a toasted bun.

The Surf and Turf (4980 ISK) strays from the usual steak and lobster, and instead pairs lobster and pork belly with a side of potato mousse, roasted fennel, tempura corn and mushrooms demi-glace. Every part of this meal works separately, allowing the diner to eat slowly piece by piece. Be sure to specify if you want your crackling to be crispy or not, and remember this is a heavy meal. You’ll probably need another Peroni… or a few cocktails?

Most of us were more than full after our main course, and in reality, we didn’t need the starters. The portions are generous without over doing it. Yet as full as we were, it didn’t take much convincing for us all to be huddled around an order of Créme Brulée (1790 ISK), tapping its torched surface with the back of our spoons. Not only was it dangerously delicious, but it contained pop-rocks, transporting all of us to simpler times, our childhood, when we had our whole lives ahead of us.

 


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