Travel
On your own
Singing Around Iceland

Singing Around Iceland

Published August 29, 2011

Accomplished English chorister Daniel Hutton is cycling 1.000 miles around Iceland for charity, singing for families in exchange for room and board. After participating in an exchange program between the ‘Good in Parts’ and ‘Kvenkonur Kópavogs’ choirs in early 2011, Daniel vowed to return with a mission.
His ‘Sing Around Iceland’ initiative is born from three things dear to his heart: singing, exploring unfamiliar landscapes, and his mother. Daniel has been avidly involved with choir since age 8, and has taken on a number of important responsibilities including concert manager of the Harrogate Choral Society since 2007 and teaching professional singing lessons. He has already released two solo CD recordings.
Yet amidst his flowering career, an unfortunate turn of events caused him to focus his efforts elsewhere. His mother learned she had developed spinal cancer and Daniel fully supported her throughout the turbulent time. As she struggled to fight the illness, which resulted in a spinal ablation procedure, he turned to the Carers’ Resource charity, which specialises in aiding friends and family of those fighting illnesses. Their cause touched him personally, and inspired him to donate half of the money he raises through ‘Sing Around Iceland’ to their cause (his goal being about 950.000 ISK total).
The other half will be given to Ljósið, a Reykjavík-based charity that has the “goal of enhancing the quality of life by strengthening the spiritual, social and physical strength” of those effected by cancer, according to their website. Daniel’s ultimate goal is to “help raise their [charities] profile so that those who could benefit most can get to know about them and recognise the invaluable work they do.”
His expedition formally began on Monday, August 8th, when he left Kópavogur equipped with his cycling gear and headed towards the Snæfellsnes peninsula. He has since cycled around the Westfjords, covering 1200 km and singing for 25 people. His next stop is Akureyri and then he will travel to Egilsstaðir by mid-September and leave the south for last. “I will try to give an idea of how far I have gotten and when I think I am likely to arrive in a region,” he says, “so that if anyone is able to offer me a bed they can see when I might reach them and decide if they can help!”
If you are interested in helping Daniel either by offering him a place to stay for the night or to make a charitable donation, please contact him through his website, www.singaroundiceland.com.



Travel
On your own
<?php the_title(); ?>

Don’t Forget to Breathe

by

“You don’t have to be crazy to go swimming in the sea, but it helps.” So says the man sitting next to me in the hot tub at Nauthólsvík, Reykjavík’s Geothermal beach. We’re facing out toward the Fossvogur bay, and if you listen carefully, you can hear the sound of the waves lapping at the shoreline. It’s six in the evening and pitch dark. But for the time being, at least, the perpetual drizzle and fog, which have hung over Reykjavík all week, has lifted, so the twinkling lights of Kópavogur are visible across the water. The man next to

Travel
On your own
<?php the_title(); ?>

Hiking In Kerlingarfjöll

by

The fine group of peaks known as Kerlingarfjöll were named after a high rock pillar that is said to be a female troll who was turned to stone as she was hit by daylight back when her kin roamed the country. The massif is colourful and rich in contrasts with its peaks and valleys, glaciers and snowfields and all that lively geothermal activity that serves to make the area so interesting. The mountains—roughly 1,100-1,500 metres tall—are part of a large, local centre of volcanic activity that has been around for a long time but is probably extinct by now. The

Travel
On your own
<?php the_title(); ?>

DIY Celebrity Walk

by

We know you all were pretty upset to learn that it wasn’t actually the real Ryan Gosling who made headlines a few weeks ago by getting his car crashed on Sæbraut. Don’t worry. There are plenty of celebrities that did come over to Iceland and got up to all sorts of silly behaviour. And guess what? We, Your Friends At The Grapevine, are here to help you get over your Gosling-blues, girl. How? By helping you create your own little DIY walking tour that covers most, if not all, of the wonderful, shiny Hollywood stars that have gotten up to

Travel
On your own
<?php the_title(); ?>

Verslunarmannahelgi Is Coming! What Shall I Do?

by

Verslunarmannahelgi (“Merchants‘ Weekend”) initially came about because the first Monday in August was designated a statutory holiday for merchants and anyone working in trade in Iceland. Nowadays, convenience stores, roadside shops and tourist shops pay their staff extra to be able to stay open on that day, so that they can make money out of all those on holiday that weekend. Meanwhile, everybody else is slacking off, because that Monday is simply a bank holiday and the weekend leading up to it is the summer’s biggest camping and festival weekend. ÞJÓÐHÁTÍÐ Some of the festivals have been ongoing concerns for

Travel
On your own
<?php the_title(); ?>

A Scavenger Hunt Via GPS

by

On Friday evening we set off toward Skagafjörður where we would spend the weekend exploring. It wouldn’t be like anything we had done before; Bragi Jónsson, an Icelander who certainly knows his way around the island, would be taking us geocaching. This modern form of a scavenger hunt via GPS is played in more than 200 countries. A German traveller introduced it to Bragi in 2009 and he has since looked for caches not only in Iceland but also in Denmark and Norway. “It takes me to places I have not been to before and will keep on doing so,”

Travel
On your own
<?php the_title(); ?>

Exploring The Reykjanes Peninsula

by

You may have noticed while looking at a map of Iceland that the Reykjanes Peninsula, where the Keflavik International Airport is situated, has a familiar shape. It looks like a boot, like a miniature version of good old Italy. You might find some similarities, like mountains, seaports and volcanic activity but the likeness mostly ends there. The Reykjanes Peninsula is rugged and even desert-like in some areas with most of the vegetation consisting of sturdy, low profile grass, heather, moss and lichen. Birds are abundant in the summer, especially around the spectacular marine cliffs like Hafnarberg and Krýsuvíkurbjarg in the

Show Me More!