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A Day In The Life Of Guðmundur Jörundsson

A Day In The Life Of Guðmundur Jörundsson

Published June 29, 2011

What’s up, Guðmundur?
I graduated last weekend in fashion design from the Iceland Academy of Arts, which was pretty nice. Now I’m working on a new men’s fashion line for both Herrafataverzlun Kormáks & Skjaldar and GK Reykjavík. Next week we’ll film a new fashion/music video to the GusGus song, ‘Over’. My colleagues at Narvi Creative Studio are co producing it with GusGus and my graduation fashion line will be used. Otherwise I try to go fishing when I can.
Early Morning
On the rare occasion that I don’t go straight to work in the morning, I stop by Kaffismiðjan (Kárastígur 1). It’s on my way and it’s a great place to hang out. I expect to do more of that this winter after I’ve populated the world.
Lunch
I never go anywhere but Dill (Sturlugata 5) for lunch. Well, sometimes I go to Grillið (Hotel Saga, Hagatorg).
Mid-Day
There’s nothing better than sitting in a hot tub at either Sundhöll Reykjavíkur (Barónstígur) or the Seltjarnarnes swimming pool (Suðurströnd). Although I hate nothing more than the Vesturbæjarlaug swimming pool (Hofsvallagata).
Afternoon
It’s refreshing to have a drink at Ölstofa Kormáks & Skjaldar (Vegamótastígur 4) after a long workday. That’s very refreshing.
Heat Of The Night
I most enjoy spending the evenings at friend’s houses in good company. If I go to a bar, it’s usually Bakkus (Tryggvagata 22), at least these days.



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