Travel
Destinations
STOCKHOLM Picks

STOCKHOLM Picks

Published March 11, 2005

The Blue Tower, The Strindberg Museum, Dronninggatan 85
Strindberg’s last home, and where he died in 1912. Apart from his apartment and study, still preserved with original furniture, the museum houses Strindberg- related exhibitions. Its current exhibit, running from February 27th to September 4th, is called “Strindberg’s Friends and Enemies”. Strindberg made many of both because of his political stance, and particularly for his support of unions. If you prefer a cartoon version of the master, go to http://www.strindbergandhelium.com/
Kulturhuset, Sergels torg
Hard to miss if you go downtown, the gigantic Culture House is almost like a mall of modern art. Housing a library of both books and comics, a TV room where you can watch TV from all over the world and various exhibitions, the Culture House proves that the words culture and fun can go hand in hand. Instead of a cinema, the house is also home to the Stockholm City Theatre. Its current exhibit, until May 8th, is a collection of photographs from the Helsinki School, and their play is “Lilla fittan paa Prarien,” (The Little Pussy on the Prarie). Nuff said.
Centralbadet Swimming Pool, Drottninggatan 88
Built in the Jugend style in 1904, the Central Bath has been renovated and has all the modern comforts you could want. Admission includes entry to the tubs, swimming pool and saunas, and there’s also a bar, although they won’t let you swim if you’ve had a drink. If you want to pay more, you can get all sorts of massage, mudbaths and even acupuncture. Now that might sound like a good idea once you’ve had a few.
Bla Dörren, Södermalms Torg 6
Fans of the Swedish chef in The Muppet Show will probably be dying to sample some meatballs. If you happen to be in town on a Sunday, you could do worse than the Blue Door, which has Swedish specialties, such as Elk Meatballs and Swordfish for the not too bad price of 100 Swedish Crowns (roughly 1000 Icelandic). The also have 60 local brands of beer and a wide selection of Schnapps. And, best of all, everything seems to be in either blue or yellow.
The Royal Palace
Well, you can hardly go to Stockholm and not visit the Royal Palace. It is, after all, where Laxness got his prize. You can walk around inside the palace itself, or visit the museum in the Armoury or the Treasury. And downstairs you can see the remains of the original Tre Kronor Castle from the 13th century, which was the foundation for Stockholm. Don’t miss the changing of the guard. The king still conducts business here, but prefers to live on the nearby island of Dronningholm.



Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland In Miniature

by

Having planned to spend much of this summer—my first summer in Iceland, in fact—gallivanting around the country, I’ve instead spent most of my time in the city, close to home. But today, I’m lucky. In the name of research, my partner and I get twelve hours to explore the Snæfellsnes peninsula. This is “Iceland in miniature,” I’ve been told, a veritable “Best Of” sampler where many of the country’s most sought-out natural wonders exist side by side. Above The Lava Field Circumnavigating the whole peninsula would only take about three hours, but with limited time at our disposal, we decide

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

A School For The Beer-Curious

by

In a small lecture hall doubling as a private bar, twenty men raise their glasses and have a big gulp of Egils Gull as Stefán “Stebbi” Pálsson begins the bjórskólinn (“beer school”) curriculum. The school is hosted by Ölgerðin, one of Iceland’s two largest breweries, and offers the obtuse a chance to learn more about beer and its culture. We recommend that students don’t arrive on an empty stomach and pace themselves, as even the hardiest of people can be toppled by the school’s free refills. We begin our adventure by looking into the history of beer and its culture.

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Furiously Chasing Tranquility In Ísafjörður

by

Through my travels, I’ve been lucky enough to meet a ton of Icelanders who have become some of my closest friends—I might call them family. At this point, I’m proud to say I’m fully enmeshed in the “Icelandic Connection” now, which means being open to Icelandic travellers (individuals, artists, musicians, grandparents—you name it) to my home in Philadelphia. The “Iceland Connected” have a code to my home’s lockbox for easy access. If you don’t mind cats, the place is yours. Be in touch. I’ve thus gone to Iceland a couple of times, and always greatly enjoyed my visits. This time,

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Where Are The Glowing Rocks?

by

As you would expect, many visitors to Iceland are more than eager to view the country’s famous volcanoes. They may, however, be surprised to discover little more than rugged, cold lava flows and non-smoking volcanoes. These are of course fine sights, but they’re not the glowing lava and fuming craters that many expect from one of the most active volcanic regions of the world. The explanation is rather simple: One needs to happen upon a live magma-spouting event to see those spectacular sights, and those occur roughly once every three to four years. ICELAND IS BORN Iceland formed gradually over

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

Not For Your Average Latté-Drinker

by

“What are all these people doing here?” a guy asked his mate in the fourth row. “Beats me,” he replied, looking up at us as we walked past to find our seats on Air Iceland’s 37-seat Dash 8 bound for Ilulissat. Home to 5,000 people and 7,000 dogs, Ilulissat in West Greenland is not exactly your typical holiday destination. After all, its only international connection is Reykjavík, which is already in the middle of the North Atlantic—at least five hours from the United States and three from mainland Europe. From Reykjavík though, it’s just four hours to the west coast

Travel
Destinations
<?php the_title(); ?>

High Hopes For Husavík

by

The northeast of Iceland has been steadily growing in popularity as a tourism destination, and small wonder, as it has a lot to offer. Just off the Ring Road, there are the haunting Dimmuborgir (“Dark Cities”), which have served as inspiration for many a troll story as well as for a Norwegian black metal band of the same name. When you see the rock formations, which look as if they were sculpted by an artistically challenged Goth, you can see why. If the scenery looks otherworldly, you aren’t the first to think so. It was here at Eldhraun (“Fire Lava,”

Show Me More!