News
UKLA Award For Icelandic Author

UKLA Award For Icelandic Author

Photos by
Gunnar Gunnarsson

Published July 10, 2014

The English translation of Andri Snær Magnússon’s “The Story Of The Blue Planet” has won the UK Literacy Association (UKLA) award.

Andri Snær shared the news of the award, for the category of literature for children aged 7 to 11, which honours authors writing children’s literature taught in a classroom setting. This makes the first time a UKLA award has been given to a book in translation.

The Story of the Blue Planet comes alive when you read it to a class of children who love the idea of a place populated entirely by children,” wrote Jane Steel, one of the award’s judges, of her decision. “Into this blissful existence comes the shady character of Jolly-Goodday who entices them into a whole new level of fun – but at a cost … Suspense, laughter and many questions accompany each chapter in this book, which has been enjoyed by classes throughout the 7-11 age range, each appreciating it on different levels and inspiring moral, philosophical and environmental debate.”

The New York Times, reviewing The Story of the Blue Planet in 2012, said in part that it was “immensely satisfying — a major contribution to the sparsely populated eco-lit genre, and one that could entice other authors to contribute.”

The award is a new one of many for Andri Snær, who has been a prolific author, playwright and film-maker for over a decade. The release of his novel Dreamland: A Self-Help Manual for a Frightened Nation brought him considerably more international recognition, and was later made into an award-winning documentary.

Related:

The First Capitalist-Realist Poet?

Hearing The Airwords With Andri Snær Magnússon

Larissa Kyzer’s Three Percent Review of LoveStar.

Andri Snær waxes poetic on the fall of an Icelandic mayonnaise company.


News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Icelandic Hot Dogs Containing Danish Beef

by

Sláturfélag Suðurlands (SS) reports that there is a shortage of Icelandic beef, prompting the company to blend Danish beef into their hot dogs. Sold under the slogan “Icelanders Eat SS Hot Dogs”, SS hot dogs are arguably one of Iceland’s iconic foods. However, Viðskiptablaðið reports that they are no longer 100% Icelandic. “Unfortunately, due to the present shortage of Icelandic beef, we have been forced to use a little Danish beef that meets our quality standards,” SS product manager Guðmundur Svavarsson told reporters. While not specifying on the exact quantity of Danish beef in the hot dogs, Guðmundur provided assurances

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

New Wave Of “Microsoft” Fraudsters Hit Iceland

by

Fraudsters pretending to be employees of Microsoft are contacting Icelanders by both letter and telephone. MBL reports that one of the most common tactics these fraudsters will use will be to call people on their home phones, purporting to be employees of Microsoft. These fraudsters tell the potential victim that Microsoft has detected a virus on their computer, and that in order to be rid of it, they must go to a specific website to download and install “virus removal software”. In reality, these are not people calling from Microsoft, who cannot see into your computer to look for viruses

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Fewest Sunny Days In 25 Years

by

July in Iceland has so far had one of the fewest sunny days in over a generation. MBL reports that July has only had three completely cloudy days so far – July 1, 10 and 18. However, a lack of completely cloudy days does not necessarily mean an abundance of sunny days. 50.6 hours of sunlight have been recorded for the month of July so far. This is 58.5 fewer hours than the sunlight average for July calculated from 1961 to 1990, and 85.3 fewer hours than the average over the past ten years. In fact, there has not been

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland’s Symphony Conductor Joins Protest In Tel Aviv

by

Conductor and Music Director of the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Ilan Volkov, will lead an ensemble of musicians at an anti-war protest today at Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square, reports Slipped Disc. The protest will call for peace talks and an end to the occupation. A number of other cultural personalities have pledged their support and will be participating.  “We will do some improvised vocal and instrumental response to the situation. It is a small part of an evening with many other performances.” said Ilan.  The group will gather in the square at 8pm. Their slogan reads: ‘We stand together against the silence of

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Sturla Turns 800

by

A celebration is planned in Dalasýsla this weekend to mark 800 years since the birth of saga writer Sturla Þórðarson, reports Vísir. The guest of honour will be former president Vigdís Finnbogadóttir and guest speakers include; Speaker of the House Einar K. Guðfinnsson, Norwegian politician Olemic Thommessen, writer Einar Kárason and director of the Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Guðrún Nordal. Sturla Þórðarson, Snorri Sturluson’s nephew and pupil, was a chieftain as well as a saga and contemporary history writer active in the 13th century. His most famous work is Íslendinga saga, the longest saga within Sturlunga saga. In the wake of the dissolution of

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Foreign Committee To Meet Over Gaza

by

Iceland’s Foreign Affairs Committee will meet to discuss the situation in Gaza, although the Foreign Minister has called it “pointless” to cut ties with Israel. RÚV reports that Birgir Ármannsson, the chairperson of the Foreign Affairs Committee, will call together the committee to discuss the situation in Gaza. “The events that we have been closely following are of course tragic, and they cause us a lot of worry,” he told reporters. “The news that is being reported, daily now, underlines the seriousness of the issue.” The committee’s meeting is in response to a request from Left-Green MP Svandís Svavarsdóttir to

Show Me More!