New Child Dental Care Plan Begins Today

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Published May 15, 2013

A new contract between Icelandic Health Insurance and the Association of Icelandic Dentists (Tannlæknafélags Íslands) which covers more of the cost of child dental care takes effect today.
According to the new contract, which is valid until April 30 2019, Icelandic Health Insurance will gradually begin to pay for all dental care costs of children under 18, excluding the annual visiting fee which amounts to 2500 krónur.
At first, the contract only applies to children between 15-17 years old, who are considered most at-risk for poor dental hygiene. The contract takes effect for children of other age groups in stages, with children under 3 years being the last group to be included on January 1 2018.  A table showing how the plan will gradually cover different age groups is provided here.
According to the Icelandic Health Insurance announcement, children must register with a family dentist in order to be eligible for the plan. Parents or guardians can register their children with a family dentist who has signed the agreement by visiting the Icelandic Health Insurance homepage, and clicking on Réttindagátt.          



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