Lagarfljót Ecosystem Continues To Deteriorate

Published March 12, 2013

The ecosystem in and around Lagarfljót, the famous lake in the East Iceland municipality of Fljótsdalshérað, is deteriorating at an alarming rate, according to a report prepared by Landsvirkjun, a state-owned energy company and supplier of the majority of the country’s electricity, RÚV reports.
Gunnar Jónsson, chairman of Fljótsdalshérað council, cited evidence for the disintegration of ecosystem, including a decrease in the fish population as well as smaller fish, overall. This, in turn, impacts the larger environment by negatively impacting the area’s birdlife, which depend on the fish for sustenance.
The reason for the deterioration is very clear, according to Gunnar. Sediment clogging the waterway following the construction of the Kárahnjúkar Dam has been much greater than initial environmental assessments of the project has predicted.
Commenting on whether Landsvirkjun, which built and manages the dam and power plant at Kárahnjúkar, had proposed any action to help reverse the damage that has been done Gunnar said: “Yes, mitigation efforts have been mentioned, but I think I can say that stopping the flow from Hálslón [the reservoir on the Jökulsá á Dal river at the Kárahnjúkar Dam] is not being discussed.”
Fljótsdalshérað town council will discuss the situation when they meet tomorrow.
Related:
Famous Lake Decaying
Investigation into Previous Environmental Ministry Demanded
Kárahnjúkar Impact Report To Be investigated



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