Increased Theft In Reykjavík Bars And Clubs

Published February 20, 2013

Reykjavík police are warning the public of an increase in theft in the city’s nightlife venues in recent months. The greatest increase has been noted in the city centre, but bars and clubs outside the centre have also been affected, mbl.is reports.
The no-good thieves will watch for somebody unsuspecting to put down their jacket or handbag and then make their move, with the most often pilfered items being mobile phones and handbags. Some opportunistic dirtbags have been walking away with people’s jackets and other articles of clothing, as well.
Police suggest that every pay a little more attention to their belongings when enjoying Reykjavík’s nightlife. They failed to add that thieves and pick-pockets can go to hell, but that should be a given.



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