A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.

The Worst Outcome Would Be No New Constitution

Published February 13, 2013

Salvör Nordal, former chairman of the Constitutional Council, is stressing the importance of taking into consideration the comments submitted by the Venice Commission of the Council of Europe on Iceland’s constitutional draft, adding that the worst possible outcome at this point would be that nothing would come out of all the work that has been done toward instituting a new constitution, RÚV reports.
Speaking with Morgunútvarpinu television program this morning, Salvör expressed her disappointment that the reviews of the constitution, both by the parliamentary interior and by the Venice Commission, have taken so long. She notes that many of the comments that arose in the Venice Commission’s report had been brought up previously during local discussions of the constitution, but the comments must still be respected and addressed before the constitution can move forward.
“The worst case scenario would be that the issue would hit a wall and people would be less motivated to take the matter back up following the elections,” Salvör said.
The committee responsible for drafting the Iceland’s new constitution had submitted it for parliamentary review last summer, and the parliamentary committee responsible for undertaking the first review of the text was doing so still while the nation went to the polls in October to vote on the need for a new constitution and on several suggested amendments that the new constitution may include. Parliament returned their notes to the committee in November, at which point the text was sent to the Venice Commission, the Council of Europe’s advisory board on on constitutional matters. The Venice Commission returned their notes to parliament just this week, and so parliament has just a dozen working days remaining to review the notes, implement any suggested changes and then vote on the enactment of the new constitution before the elections take place in April.
Related:
Constitution Draft Submitted
Iceland Says Yes To New Constitution
Democratic Alliance Chairman Working Toward New Constitution



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Geir Haarde Lands Washington D.C Ambassadorial Post

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Former Prime Minister of Iceland, Geir H. Haarde, has landed a pivotal ambassadorial post in Washington D.C, reports RÚV. Geir is most known for being prime minister during Iceland’s 2008 economic meltdown. In 2010, parliament voted in favour of Geir standing trial for negligence and mismanagement while in office. Geir was eventually found guilty of one of the four charges of negligence levied against him. As reported, the charge was that he either knew or should have known that he had to respond in some way to the information he had been receiving that the economy was unstable. Prosecutor Sigríður

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Iceland Sends Men Only To UN Conference On Women

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Iceland, considered a global leader in gender equality, has announced it will send only men to a U.N. conference on women and gender equality, reports ABC. Minister of Foreign Affairs, Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson told the U.N. General Assembly of world leaders on Monday that the January “barbershop” conference will be unique, “as it will be the first time at the United Nations that we bring together only male leaders to discuss gender equality.” It won’t however, be the first time in history that male leaders get together to discuss women’s issues, without any women present. According to Gunnar Bragi, the

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Tax Committee Chair: “No Choice” But For Government To Buy Tax Evasion Evidence

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The chairperson of parliament’s Tax and Economics Committee believes the Icelandic government should buy evidence of tax evasion, a sample of which has already been offered to authorities. RÚV reports that Frosti Sigurjónsson, a Progressive MP and the chairperson of the Tax and Economics Committee, believes the government should pay to receive only legal documentation of Icelanders evading taxes. If the documents were illegally obtained, he added, this detail would certainly “complicate” matters. “If it’s true what I’ve heard, that the Germans have gone this way, buying this kind of information, than I believe we have no choice but to

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No Known Icelanders In ISIS

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The National Commissioner of the Icelandic Police confirms there is no evidence that any Icelanders have joined forces with the theocratic extremist group ISIS. Vísir reports that they sent a formal inquiry to the police on the matter, and were informed that – to the best of anybody’s knowledge – no Icelandic citizens have joined forces with ISIS. As far-fetched as the possibility may sound, European Union anti-terrorism chief Gilles de Kerchove told the BBC that over 3,000 EU citizens have already joined ISIS. Closer to home, Vísir adds that at the beginning of the summer, Danish secret services revealed

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Murder In Breiðholt

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A 28-year-old man is in police custody, suspected of having strangled his wife. The suspect denies the charges against him. RÚV reports police were alerted to the scene shortly after midnight yesterday, at which time the victim had been dead for a few hours. It is also reported that the couple’s two children, aged two and five, were in the home at the time of death, but were asleep. Vísir reports that the suspect denies killing his wife, and was led into Reykjavík District Court yesterday for a custody hearing. He will remain in police custody until October 17. “These

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Volcano Watch: Lava Field Bigger Than Lake Mývatn

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The lava field created by the Holuhraun eruption is now 44.5 square kilometres, reports RÚV. By comparison, Lake Mývatn is 37 km2. Seismic activity continues to be strong with as many as 60 earthquakes reported in the Bárðarbunga area on Saturday. The largest earthquake reported yesterday had a magnitude of 5.2 and the subsidence of Bárðarbunga caldera continues. Since September 12, the caldera has subsided by 7 metres and the subsidence has now reached the caldera’s half-way point. Iceland’s Civil Protection and Emergency Management services have closed roads in the Northeast, north of Dyngjufall as well as some roads out

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