Mayor’s Office Moves To Breiðholt

Published January 18, 2013

The mayor will temporarily move his office to the east Reykjavík neighbourhood of Breiðholt this Monday.
The Reykjavík city hall website reports that the mayor and his secretary will work from their office in Breiðholt from January 21 until February 7. City council will also hold meetings there.
The purpose for the three-week stay, the site announces, will be for the mayor and other city officials to get better acquainted with what they call “the most diverse neighbourhood of the city.” About 20,600 people live in Breiðholt, and 10.2% of them are foreigners, as opposed to about 8% in other areas of the capital.
“In my time as mayor,” Gnarr said, “I have participated in the working shifts of police officers, sanitation workers, firefighters and others. This has been incredibly rewarding and educational. Now I intend to spend my time in another neighbourhood. It’s an important experiment and I look forward to seeing how it goes.”
The mayor’s office will be at Gerðuberg during this time.



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