A Grapevine service announcement Be patient: That eruption is expected to last until 2015

No Borders To March On Ministry

Published January 17, 2013

No Borders Iceland has announced that tomorrow afternoon they will organise downtown and then march to the Ministry of the Interior, demanding greater rights for asylum seekers.
According to their Event posting, No Borders Iceland invites the general public to gather at the downtown park Hjartagarðurinn at 15:00 tomorrow. At 16:00, they will march from that location to the Ministry of the Interior, located on Sölvhólsgata 7. The group also promises that “we will have a mobile sound system in a car dropping revolutionary beats”.
Their demands, as always, revolve around asylum seeker law reform. In particular, they want asylum seekers to be granted the right to live and work in Iceland, and for processing times for refugee applications to be expedited, among other things.
In fact, last Friday the ruling coalition of government approved a bill that proposes a number of changes to immigration and refugee law. Among them is to do away with arresting and charging refugees who come to Iceland with false passports. The time period for processing an asylum seeker application would be set at a maximum of six months. If, for whatever reason, the process takes longer than 18 months, the asylum seeker would be granted a residence permit on humanitarian grounds. The bill would also create an independent committee for those applying for residence in Iceland as asylum seekers.
No Borders has taken issue with Ögmundur on a number of occasions in the past. Last November, they criticised him for making a speech in front of the US embassy voicing opposition to American support of Israel, during a time when it was engaged in a military campaign with Gaza. No Borders, in turn, responded, “One could ask the minister, ‘How many asylum seekers will be sent to their deaths before the end of the month?'”



News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Two-Thirds Against Alcohol In Supermarkets

by

Vísir/Fréttablaðið today published a poll indicating that two-thirds of the Icelandic population would rather not see alcohol sold in grocery stores. Recently proposed changes Last month, Independence Party MP Vilhjálmur Árnason was first speaker for a proposal to amend the law on retail in alcohol and tobacco, and other related legislature, which would allow any private enterprise with a retail-permit to sell alcoholic beverages. As it is, the State reserves monopoly in that market, through its liquor stores, and has done so since the end of general prohibition in 1922. Introducing the proposal, Vilhjálmur said that its aim was “to

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Preferred Filmmakers To Know Little About The Country

by

Icelandic filmmakers have expressed their surprise and bemusement at Promote Iceland’s decision to outsource the production of a recent promotional video to international producers Pulse Films. The video is part of Promote Iceland’s ongoing campaign, “Inspired by Iceland”, and supposed to introduce Iceland as an exciting winter destination. Interviewed by Vísir, Hrafnhildur Gunnarsdóttir, Chair of the Icelandic Filmmakers Association, said: “It is incredibly strange, especially in the current climate when Icelandic filmmakers are struggling to survive, that they look for foreign producers. It is weird that they don’t try to get Icelandic filmmakers involved.” Stefanía Thors, Vice Chair of the

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

126 Icelanders Would Rather Be Forgotten

by

126 of over 150,000 socalled “privacy requests” received by Google this year came from Iceland. These 126 requests involved 282 URLs, around a third of which were removed as requested. This is according to figures published by Google in a recent report. Privacy requests are based on what has been coined “the right to be forgotten”, established in Europe by precedent of a ruling at the European Court of Justice in May. Since then, Google is bound to process requests from European citizens to remove links in search results related to their name. Google’s report does not cite specific examples

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

WHAT THE FLIPPING HELL?

by

Alright. So this surveillance video from the Höfðatorg parking garage in Reykjavík has been making the rounds in Iceland and across the greater internet today, after the garage’s custodian, Albert Guðbrandsson, uploaded it to YouTube (having resisted the urge for an entire three years – now that’s some willpower!). In the video, we can see… um… well. Yeah. No idea what’s going on there. The video was caught at around midnight in July of 2011. RÚV notes that the driver was made to pay for the damages he caused to the garage’s gate, and that police were involved in the

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Icelanders Object To More Machine Guns For Cops

by

Many Icelandic citizens are voicing their opposition to the recent police acquisition of MP5 submachine guns, manifesting in protest and petition alike. Icelanders have long prided themselves as belonging to a peaceful, army-free country. This is being cited by many Icelanders on social media as amongst the reason why they object to recent news that the Icelandic police have received and bought a cache of 150 MP5 submachine guns and untold numbers of Glock-17 semiautomatics from Norway. At the time of this writing, over 400 Icelanders have said they will be attending a demonstration to be held this Friday in

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland Gets Closer To 330,000 Mark

by

Iceland’s population reached 328,170 at the end of the third quarter of the year, increasing by over a thousand in just three months. Statistics Iceland reports that there are more men than women in Iceland, at 164,710 and 163,460 respectively, and over two-thirds of the total population – or 210,660 people – live in the capital area alone. 23,840 people living in Iceland are foreign citizens, with 860 more foreigners entering the country than leaving it, and 400 more Icelandic citizens leaving the country than moving to it. The vast majority of Icelanders who left the country went to somewhere

Show Me More!