A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.

About One In Three Icelanders Own Guns

Published January 2, 2013

In light of recent remarks by Reykjavík mayor Jón Gnarr about America’s gun culture, a better look at Iceland’s gun culture turns up a number of differences between the two countries.
As many are likely aware, violent crime in Iceland does exist, but is almost always unrelated to guns. In fact, the use of a gun in committing any crime is cause for media attention. Last week, Reykjavík mayor Jón Gnarr spoke up about American gun culture, expressing bewilderment that the US would pressure Iceland to stop hunting whales while having no problem with the proliferation of small arms within America.
It would seem as though Icelanders in general have an aversion then to guns. However, statistics on gun ownership in Iceland show them to actually be a somewhat popular purchase.
The total number of guns in Iceland is estimated to be around 90,000, ranking Iceland 15th in the world in terms of number of guns per person. With a population of just over 300,000, this translates to about one in three Icelanders being gun owners. This is actually lower in rank than most other Nordic countries, behind Finland (4th), Sweden (10th) and Norway (11th). Denmark is far behind the pack, ranked 54th in the world.
Despite this relatively high rate of gun ownership, the number of gun related deaths in Iceland is very low – only four were reported in 2009, which includes suicide, homocide, and accidental shooting.
All guns in Iceland may only be purchased by those with a license to own a firearm, and all guns are registered in a national database. The vast majority of these weapons are shotguns and hunting rifles.



News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Geir Haarde Lands Washington D.C Ambassadorial Post

by

Former Prime Minister of Iceland, Geir H. Haarde, has landed a pivotal ambassadorial post in Washington D.C, reports RÚV. Geir is most known for being prime minister during Iceland’s 2008 economic meltdown. In 2010, parliament voted in favour of Geir standing trial for negligence and mismanagement while in office. Geir was eventually found guilty of one of the four charges of negligence levied against him. As reported, the charge was that he either knew or should have known that he had to respond in some way to the information he had been receiving that the economy was unstable. Prosecutor Sigríður

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland Sends Men Only To UN Conference On Women

by

Iceland, considered a global leader in gender equality, has announced it will send only men to a U.N. conference on women and gender equality, reports ABC. Minister of Foreign Affairs, Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson told the U.N. General Assembly of world leaders on Monday that the January “barbershop” conference will be unique, “as it will be the first time at the United Nations that we bring together only male leaders to discuss gender equality.” It won’t however, be the first time in history that male leaders get together to discuss women’s issues, without any women present. According to Gunnar Bragi, the

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Tax Committee Chair: “No Choice” But For Government To Buy Tax Evasion Evidence

by

The chairperson of parliament’s Tax and Economics Committee believes the Icelandic government should buy evidence of tax evasion, a sample of which has already been offered to authorities. RÚV reports that Frosti Sigurjónsson, a Progressive MP and the chairperson of the Tax and Economics Committee, believes the government should pay to receive only legal documentation of Icelanders evading taxes. If the documents were illegally obtained, he added, this detail would certainly “complicate” matters. “If it’s true what I’ve heard, that the Germans have gone this way, buying this kind of information, than I believe we have no choice but to

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

No Known Icelanders In ISIS

by

The National Commissioner of the Icelandic Police confirms there is no evidence that any Icelanders have joined forces with the theocratic extremist group ISIS. Vísir reports that they sent a formal inquiry to the police on the matter, and were informed that – to the best of anybody’s knowledge – no Icelandic citizens have joined forces with ISIS. As far-fetched as the possibility may sound, European Union anti-terrorism chief Gilles de Kerchove told the BBC that over 3,000 EU citizens have already joined ISIS. Closer to home, Vísir adds that at the beginning of the summer, Danish secret services revealed

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Murder In Breiðholt

by

A 28-year-old man is in police custody, suspected of having strangled his wife. The suspect denies the charges against him. RÚV reports police were alerted to the scene shortly after midnight yesterday, at which time the victim had been dead for a few hours. It is also reported that the couple’s two children, aged two and five, were in the home at the time of death, but were asleep. Vísir reports that the suspect denies killing his wife, and was led into Reykjavík District Court yesterday for a custody hearing. He will remain in police custody until October 17. “These

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Volcano Watch: Lava Field Bigger Than Lake Mývatn

by

The lava field created by the Holuhraun eruption is now 44.5 square kilometres, reports RÚV. By comparison, Lake Mývatn is 37 km2. Seismic activity continues to be strong with as many as 60 earthquakes reported in the Bárðarbunga area on Saturday. The largest earthquake reported yesterday had a magnitude of 5.2 and the subsidence of Bárðarbunga caldera continues. Since September 12, the caldera has subsided by 7 metres and the subsidence has now reached the caldera’s half-way point. Iceland’s Civil Protection and Emergency Management services have closed roads in the Northeast, north of Dyngjufall as well as some roads out

Show Me More!