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Arsenic In Some Foods Sold In Iceland

Arsenic In Some Foods Sold In Iceland

Published December 7, 2012

In light of new research to come out of the US about arsenic in food, the Consumer Association has issued a public warning about some foods sold in Iceland.
Consumer Reports published an article last month warning of high levels of arsenic in rice and rice-based foods. The arsenic in these products is derived from the soil the rice is grown in, which has soaked up in some cases decades’ worth of insecticides.
RÚV reports that the Consumer Association of Iceland is now issuing a warning of its own to the general public regarding rice and rice products sold in the country.
Brynhildur Pétursdóttir, the director of the association, told reporters that children under three should only eat rice very occasionally at best, especially those children who do not take dairy food. Everyone else would be well advised to be sure and cook rice in plenty of water.
Consumer Reports also found arsenic present in some fruit juices, but the Consumer Association has not as yet done more exact research into which, if any, juices in Iceland may contain arsenic.
Arsenic is a carcinogenic poison that can build up in the body over a period of years, doing damage to vital organs.



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