Iceland Now Slightly Less Corrupt

Published December 5, 2012

Iceland has improved its corruption standing since last year, Transparency International reports, but is still far below where it used to be only seven years ago.
Transparency International (TI) is an international organisation which measures levels of corruption in countries around the world, based on political, cultural and economic factors. Iceland had long topped the list as the least corrupt country in the world, but soon began to fall from 2007 onwards, hitting an all-time low of 13th place last year.
That trend has begun to reverse, as Iceland now ranks at 11th place.
TI deems New Zealand the least corrupt country in the world out of 176 nations, followed by Denmark and Finland. Greece, by contrast, is considered the most corrupt country in Europe, at 94th place. Greece now surpasses Bulgaria, who have long held that rank.
On a global level, the most corrupt countries in the world are represented by a three-way tie between Somalia, North Korea and Afghanistan.



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