Some Examples Of False Parenthood Arise

Published November 23, 2012

Icelandic authorities have discovered some cases where supposed parents of a child are suspected of not being related to the child at all, and may have abused them.
Kristín Völundardóttir, the director of the Directorate of Immigration, told Fréttablaðið that about a dozen documents proving parenthood of a child brought to Iceland have turned out to be falsified.
When such a circumstance arises, a DNA test is called for. However, this particular DNA test is expensive – about 190,000 ISK. Added to this is the problem of the directorate being greatly understaffed.
Margrét Steinarsdóttir, the director of the Icelandic Human Rights Center, told Vísir that there have been examples of children coming to them who claimed that their parents were not blood related to them, and had abused them, sometimes for years on end.
Kristín says some other solution must be found to this problem. As it is now, if a child arriving in Iceland is found to be in possession of falsified documents regarding its parents, the child can end up deported.



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