A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.

Vodafone Clarifies Position On Filtering Content

Published September 12, 2012

In response to a story Grapevine reported about Vodafone possibly blocking access to porn and gambling sites, a spokesperson for Vodafone explained in further detail what ideas are – and are not – on the table.
On Monday, Grapevine reported on a story from RÚV which stated that Iceland’s two largest ISPs, Vodafone and Síminn, were considering blocking customer access to porn and gambling sites, justifying the idea as a defence against malware. Today, Vodafone spokesperson Hrannar Pétursson wrote to the Grapevine to clarify his company’s position:

1. Vodafone is not planning to block access to any material online.
2. We have never said that a „block, if enforced, would be a way to protect customers from viruses and malware that frequently run rampant on porn and gambling sites” as stated.
3. The Grapevine story was written from a story from RUV, which again was made from radio discussions on the Online Safety Bill now being discussed in the UK. During the radio discussions I said, that Vodafone had considered to have its Online Filtering Service default on all connection. Instead of having to turn the filter on customers who choose would have to turn the filter off, using their self-service page. This would not require them to list the sites they want access to and would happen without any interference by us.
4. It is incorrect that „customers could still request access to such sites … but doing so would require users to tell their ISP what risqué sites they want to visit.“ Customers would use their self-service page to turn the filtering off.
5. If – and I repeat – these discussion will lead to any actions at all, users would control their access themselves by using their self-service page.
Overall the story is based on mis-understanding.
It is as important for us, as it is for your readers, that the key messages in the story are corrected as soon as possible.



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Progressives Mock Muslims On Video

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Reykjavík’s two Progressive councilpersons showed up at a student party uninvited and held forth in an incident captured on video. Vísir reports that last Friday night, political science and economics students from the University of Iceland were holding a party at Hverfisgata 33. The upper floors of this building are home to a reception hall, as well as the offices of the Progressive Party. At some point in the evening, some of these Progressives decided to pay a visit. A student at the scene reported that the Progressives were having an event of their own on the floor below the

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Landowners Demand End To Smelter Pollution

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A group of landowners in Reyðarfjörður have told the Alcoa Fjarðaál aluminium smelter to stop the emission of fluoride in the area. Austurfrétt reports that the landowners’ group Landeigendur Áreyja has told the directorship to put an end to the omissions, which they say are far too high. Guðrún Kjartansdóttir, speaking to reporters on the matter, said that before the smelter was built, area residents were promised that they need not worry about any kind of fluoride pollution from the smelter. “We were told that this would be a very hi-tech and perfect smelter,” she said. “It is unacceptable to

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Immigrant Wins Work Permit Challenge Against Government

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An immigrant from Iran has won a court case against the Icelandic government, after he was denied a work permit on grounds the court found insufficient. MBL reports that the man in question came to Iceland from Iran in 2011, originally on a student permit. Later in the year, he bought an import company, taking a seat on the directorship and registering himself as the managing director. After buying the company, the man changed the company’s name, and began to import silk and carpets from the Middle East, as well as dates, nuts and other foodstuffs. However, in March 2013

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Volcano Watch: Bárðarbunga And Holuhraun Update

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Bárðarbunga caldera continues to subside at the same rate as before, roughly half a metre per day, reports the Institute of Earth Sciences. Large earthquakes are still being detected in the Bárðarbunga caldera, several with a magnitudes over 3, some over 5. The lava production at the currently active Holuhraun eruption continues to be strong. The lava flow is now around the centre of the lava field, which has grown to around 37 square kilometres. As reported, scientists in the field estimate that around 90% of the SO2 gas coming from the eruption originates in the active craters and only 10%

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Creditors Closer To Pay Out

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The outlook for hedge funds caught in Iceland’s $85 billion banking failure may be looking up, reports Bloomberg. The administrators overseeing claims against one of the three banks that defaulted in 2008, Glitnir Bank hf, say recent talks with a government committee indicate that it will now be easier to complete creditor settlements. “My impression is that the government had until now not been ready,” Steinunn Guðbjartsdóttir, head of Glitnir’s winding-up committee, told Bloomberg. “Now that they’ve got their processes in place, it will be possible to complete this sooner rather than later.” The main obstacle to repaying creditors has

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Poison Gas Cloud Heading Northeast

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The Icelandic Met Office predicts sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas from the Holuhraun eruption will move north and east over the next 24 hours. As can be seen, the Met Office has two maps for predicted areas where significant levels of SO2 will be present. Egilsstaðir and Reyðarfjörður are expected to be hit the hardest by the gas, which continues to pour out of the Holuhraun eruption site. However, levels of SO2 will vary from region to region, and even from hour to hour. A more detailed map allows one to see the forecast movement of SO2 concentrations through Tuesday. Simply

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