A Grapevine service announcement LOOK BUSY! Bárðarbunga Volcano Watch: The Morning Edition

Icelandic Record In Tooth Brushing To Be Set

Words by

Published March 27, 2012

In response to a recent study showing Icelandic children have poor dental hygiene when compared to children of many other countries, a national record will be set of tooth-brushing today.
The study, conducted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), examined the dental hygiene of children from countries within the OECD. Icelandic children ranked sixth to last place in this area.
In response, Mogunblaðið reports, students from Snælandsskóli – along with Sportacus of LazyTown and the employees of the school – will hold a competition in the cafeteria of the school to see who can brush their teeth the longest.
Barnaheill – Save the Children is also not taking the matter sitting down. Teaming up with the students, they have made a video which will be shown when Barnaheill holds a symposium tomorrow at Grand Hotel. There a petition will also be passed around, collecting signatures to call upon the government to do something to reverse the trend of poor dental hygiene among the country’s children.
According to a United Nations law on children’s rights, of which Iceland is a signatory, all children have the right to the best possible medical care, regardless of income. For this reason, Barnaheill contends, it is the responsibility of the government to take steps to ensure the dental hygiene of Iceland’s children improves.



News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Immigrant Children To Get Mother Tongue Classes

by

The City of Reykjavík is making preparations to set up mother tongue classes for primary school children of foreign origin. According to an announcement posted on City Hall’s webpage, the School and Recreation Council has passed a measure to set up a workgroup whose purpose it will be to outline how immigrant primary school children will be taught their native languages. The group will be comprised of representatives from all the parties in City Council, directed by Social Democrat vice councilperson Sa­bine Leskopf. The focus of the group will be to assess the need for children of foreign origin to

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

88 Fin Whales Culled So Far

by

Over half the quota of fin whales has been culled so far this summer, showing a slight decline from the year previous. Since whaling season began last June 15, Vísir reports, 88 fin whales have been culled. The maximum quota is for 154 fin whales, which may only be hunted during a 3-month period. “It’s being going decently well,” Gunnlaugur Fjólar Gunnlaugsson, the plant manager of whaling company Hvalur hf. “There are a bit fewer animals than there were at this same time last year. It’s been a difficult time, but it’ll work out.” Greenpeace, amongst others, have pointed out

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Nói Síríusly Looking For Candy Tasters

by

Icelandic candy manufacturer Nói Síríus is searching for volunteers for a “tasting panel” for the company’s product development department. The tasters chosen would be sent new candy prototypes and asked to mark them, to help Nói Síríus decide which products should make it into production. In the past few years 40-50 families have been sent these prototypes to try out but the company has now decided to expand the testing group and advertised the position on Facebook. Vísir reports that within 20 minutes 514 people had volunteered and at time of writing over 1.300 people had commented on the post,

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Scientists Can’t Agree On Bárðarbunga Eruption

by

Scientist have been busy interpreting the newest data from Bárðarbunga but cannot seem to agree on what precisely the data indicates, reports Vísir. Kristín Vogfjörð, Director of Research at the Icelandic Met Office believes that based on her interpretations of the GPS data, the pressure is receding and the likelihood of eruption is minimising. Meanwhile, Ingi Þorleifur Bjarnason, a research scholar with the Insitute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland interprets the data differently, believing that the pressure is increasing and that the volcano is rising in preparation for eruption. Magnús Tumi Guðmundsson, geophysicist and professor at the University of Iceland

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Wants To Raise Taxes On Tourism

by

An MP for the Progressive Party wants to raise taxes on hospitality services and reinstate the VAT for businesses in the tourist industry. Karl Garðarsson, posting on his Facebook, expressed objections to a proposal from the Independence Party to raise taxes on food, while “there is no sign that tourism or associated parties will pay their share.” As RÚV points out, in the summer of 2013 the ruling coalition reversed a change to tax law made by the previous government, which raised the taxes on hotel stays from 7% to 14%. This decision prompted the idea of imposing entrance fees

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Anti-Piracy Group Declaring Bankruptcy Due To Embezzlement

by

The board of anti-piracy group Smáís wants to declare bankruptcy, brought on by the former director having allegedly embezzled funds out of the company. RÚV reports that Smáís has recently filed bankruptcy papers with Reykjavík District Court. According to their filing, the main reason cited is that the former director of Smáís, Snæbjörn Steingrímsson, had been funneling money out of the company while at the same time falsifying the company’s financial reports. The embezzlement and false accounting allegedly went on for years, giving the board an inaccurate impression of the actual financial state of Smáís. Furthermore, taxes had not been

Show Me More!