Iceland Still Best Place To Be A Woman

Published January 17, 2012

Iceland remains the best place for working women to live, according to an annual report on the global gender gap.
The report, released by the World Economic Forum, measures such criteria as the wage gap, the percentage of women in the workforce, and the percentage of women who pursue higher education. The Global Gender Gap Report, while giving no country a perfect score, did rank Iceland in first place, followed by Norway, Finland and Sweden – just as they had the year previous.
“Although no country has yet achieved gender equality, all of the Nordic countries, with the exception of Denmark, have closed over 80% of the gender gap,” the report notes. “and thus serve as models and useful benchmarks for international comparisons.”
The report states further that overall, “The four highest-ranking countries—Iceland, Norway, Finland and Sweden—have closed between 80 and 85% of their gender gaps, while the lowest ranking country—Yemen—has closed less than half of its gender gap.”



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