Young Leftist-Green Proposes State Food Programme

Words by

Published March 8, 2011

A member of the youth branch of the Leftist-Green Party has proposed that the state enact a monopoly on the sale of food in Iceland.
Sindri Geir Óskarsson, chairman of the Young Leftist-Greens in Akureyri, put forward the idea in an article he wrote for the group’s website. Entitled “One nation – one government – one grocery store”, he proposes that the Icelandic government enact a “food monopoly”. Similar in principal to the sale of alcohol in Iceland, the government would be the owners of the country’s grocery stores. But the idea goes farther than that.
Sindri Geir proposes that a seven-person “shop committee” be established with the sole purpose of accepting suggestions from the general public, becoming themselves consumer representatives. The members of this committee would be voted into office every other year, and a quota system would be in place with regards to the sex of the committee members, as well as where in the country they live.
He goes on to say that with a government monopoly of grocery stores, the state will be able to have even greater influence on the eating habits of Icelanders, which Sindri Geir describes as “rather unhealthy”, pointing out the cheap availability of candy and energy drinks.
However, he also believes the result will be cheaper food for Icelanders, as it will be possible to lower import tariffs on foodstuffs and, with no middle-man, drastically reduce the mark-up on goods sold in stores. In particular, he proposes, the government could arrange prices to lower the costs of healthy foods at the level of or even below junk food.
For the moment there is no legislation submitted to parliament which bears this proposal.



News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Seal Census Results Are In

by

The numbers are in for the 8th annual seal census. In all 706 seals were spotted in a 100 km stretch of beach in northwest Iceland, reports RÚV. “We counted 706 this year which is similar to last year,” said biologist Sandra Granquist. “We counted 705-707 last year so [the numbers have] been pretty much the same in the last 3 years.” The census was conducted by  employees of The Icelandic Seal Centre  as well as a number of volunteers who arrived in the early hours of Sunday morning to help count. The census helps scientists keep track of how many seals are in the

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Severe Nursing Shortage Expected

by

A severe shortage of nurses in Iceland is expected in coming years, reports RÚV. Ólafur G. Skúlason, chairman of the Icelandic Nurses’s Association, estimates that roughly 900 of the 2800 nurses working today will retire within the next 3 years. At the same time only 400 nursing students will graduate and many seek other jobs due to the heavy workload and poor wages. Additionally, the demand for nurses is increasing quickly with the ageing population. To respond to the shortage Ólafur told mbl.is that it was important to encourage men to become nurses, not only to bolster numbers but because they

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

One Cruise Ship = 10,000 Cars

by

A single cruise ship in Reykjavík harbour releases as much pollution as 10,000 cars, in part due to a lack of necessary equipment on the part of harbour authorities. Vísir reports that 90 cruise ships, carrying over 100,000 passengers, have come to Iceland so far this year. The number of cruise ships is expected to increase to 100 next year. When a cruise ship docks in harbour, it leaves its generators running continuously. In a single 24-hour period, one cruise ship burns enough oil to equal the pollution from 10,000 cars. There is a common solution at hand – but

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Iceland And Iran May Bolster Economic Relations

by

Iran and Iceland are currently exploring economic ties with each other, and looking for ways to broaden them. PressTV reports that Director of the Trade Promotion Organization of Iran Valiollah Afkhami-Rad and Iceland’s Accredited Ambassador to Tehran Gunnar Pálsson have been in talks to review what the two countries could offer each other. Afkhami-Rad, while indicating that Iran’s new government has help the country begin to build more trade partners, said that Iceland could be a viable country to do business with. In particular, he mentioned scientific collaboration over fisheries, hydroelectric power, green energy, geology and tourism. Pálsson reportedly has

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Cutting Ties With Israel “Out Of The Question”

by

It looks very unlikely that Iceland will cut political ties with Israel, going by what the previous and current Foreign Ministers have said on the subject. While the Foreign Affairs Committee will soon meet to discuss what the Icelandic government will do in response to the attacks on Gaza, one option is vanishingly unlikely: the cutting of political ties, despite public support for such a move. DV points out that the previous Minister of Foreign Affairs, Össur Skarphéðinsson, told parliament in November 2012 that he had met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and numerous foreign ministers from Middle Eastern countries.

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Annie Places Second Despite Back Injury

by

Annie Mist Þórisdóttir finished 2nd overall in the 2014 CrossFit Games despite a back injury which threatened to keep her from competing as a Crossfit athlete for the rest of her life, reports RX Review. During a press conference after the win, Annie shared the story of her emotional recovery; how the injury left her legs numb for 6 months and unable to lift weights for a year. Despite all this plus a year and a half break from the Crossfit circuit she managed to finish just short of winner Camille Leblanc-Bazinet, showing the world Annie is still a force to be reckoned

Show Me More!