A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again

Björk Shares Government HS Orka Position With Foreign Media

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Published January 24, 2011

Artist Björk Giðmundsdóttir talked about the Icelandic government’s recently public decision to take control of HS Orka from Magma Energy. Magma scoffs at her interpretation.
As the Grapevine reported, last week organisers of a petition calling for the government to stop the sale of HS Orka to Magma Energy presented the nearly 50,000 signatures to Prime Minister Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir and Minister of Finance Finance Steingrímur J. Sigfússon.
Both Steingrímur as well as Minister for the Environment Svandís Svavarsdóttir later said that the government intends to take control of HS Orka again, either by buying out Magma Energy or be citing eminent domain. They have said that both political parties in the ruling coalition agree with this move.
Björk, speaking to the Canadian newspaper National Post, said of these announcements, “They told us they want to reverse the (Magma) deal and make sure Iceland’s energy companies and the access to its energy stay in public property. They are serious.”
Magma has responded to Björk’s statements by saying that this was just “speculation and hearsay”. How directly quoting someone is speculation or hearsay was not specified.
The government’s next step with regards to HS Orka is still pending.
Related:
Government Takes Action On HS Orka



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