A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Eruption Pollution Likely To Hit Whole Country

Aluminium Smelter Would Have Negative Environmental Impact, Says National Planning Agency

Published November 26, 2010

The Icelandic National Planning Agency released an evaluation report wherein they state that the building of an aluminium smelter near Húsavík in north Iceland would have “significant environmental impact” on the area.
The news website Smugan reports that the report specifically deals with the power plant Þeistareykjavirkjun, located near Lake Mývatn, a series of high-tension cables delivering the power to the smelter, and the smelter itself.
According to their assessment, the National Planning Agency believes that the project would have a negative impact on the surrounding area. 17,000 hectares of wilderness would be razed, the report says, damaging not just the cosmetic aspects of the scenery but also having a negative impact on the tourist industry.
Furthermore, upon completion, the entire project would every year emit greenhouse gases totalling 14% of Iceland’s current CO2 output.
The proposed smelter has been a matter of great contention in Iceland, with many conservatives arguing that it would provide a much-needed employment boost for the country as a whole.
At the same time, it has been argued that the construction of aluminium smelters in Iceland has been conducted almost entirely by labour hired from outside the country, and furthermore, the effects on the environment – and subsequently, on the tourist industry – outweigh any projected benefits it would have to Iceland’s labour market.



News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Minister Of Fisheries: Our Whaling Is Sustainable

by

The Minister of Fisheries, Sigurður Ingi Jóhannsson, says he is concerned by the démarche delivered to the Icelandic government to end the practice of whaling. Sigurður Ingi told RÚV however, that he felt it was important to highlight that all [fishing] organisations operating in Iceland do so sustainably, unlike many of the countries who signed the démarche. “I think that in the past few years we have been too shy about [our sustainable whaling practices] and I think it’s really burned us,” said Sigurður Ingi. “People and companies have maintained for a long time [that whaling has damaged the reputation of

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Volcano Update: Bárðarbunga Continues To Subside

by

The subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera continues, sinking by 45 cm just this morning following an earthquake with the magnitude of 5.4, reports RÚV. Yesterday, Civil Protection (CPEM) reported a subsidence of over 50 cm. Currently there is no information about the progress of the lava flow coming from the Holuhraun eruption. This is because of dangerous conditions which forced scientists to evacuate the area yesterday. Not before posting some excellent pictures and showing off a lava sample on Twitter though. Pahoehoe lava creeping over older lava. Credit: Uni. of Iceland/Johanne Schmithh #Bardarbunga #Holuhraun #Iceland pic.twitter.com/cvMB2f0Nh7 — Univ. of Iceland (@uni_iceland) September

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Firings At The Directorate Of Labour

by

Government-sanctioned budget cuts have forced the Directorate of Labour to let go of some of their employees and cut back on services to the unemployed. “We are struggling with a demand to reduce operational costs by about 100 million [ISK],” Gissur Pétursson, the director of the Directorate, told RÚV. “There is no other choice. We cannot conduct interviews and counseling like we would otherwise want to.” 20 employees have already been let go, operating hours have been shortened, and the service office has been closed. Gissur could not comment on the exact number of employees who will be let go

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Signs Gender Wage Gap Is Growing

by

The Union of Public Servants (SFR) has released a salary poll that shows the gender wage gap within their ranks is growing. Vísir reports that the unadjusted wage difference between men and women doing the same work within SFR is 21%. Men in SFR make, on average, 469,885 ISK per month, while women doing the same work make 369,446 ISK. This was detemined by a Capacent Gallup poll conducted for SFR. When these figures are adjusted for other factors that have an effect on salaries, the gender wage gap not only still remains, at 10%, it is also increasing. Last

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

35 Nations Exhort Iceland To End Whaling

by

All 28 European Union member states and seven other countries have delivered a demarche to the Icelandic government to end the practice of whaling. In a statement from the European Commission, they confirm that “The EU, its 28 Member States and the governments of the United States, Australia, Brazil, Israel, New Zealand, Mexico and Monaco, today declared their opposition to the fact that the Icelandic government still permits commercial whaling, in particular the hunting of fin whales and the subsequent trading of fin whale products.” The Icelandic government has received the demarche (see below), which was delivered by the EU’s

News
<?php the_title(); ?>

Eruption Pollution Likely To Hit Whole Country

by

If Holuhraun continues erupting it is likely the whole country will be effected by poisonous SO2 levels, reports RÚV. “[If the eruption continues] we can expect strong levels of SO2, especially to the northwest,” said Þorsteinn Jóhannsson, a specialist working with air pollution at the Environment Agency of Iceland. “And presumably, the direction of the wind will change at some point and then we can expect it all over the country.” RÚV reports that SO2 pollution measured 1,250 micrograms per cubic meter in Reykjahlíð near Lake Mývatn last night. The maximum safety limit for SO2 is 600 micrograms per cubic meter. Several

Show Me More!