A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.

Controversial Policeman Back On the Job

Published November 11, 2010

The police have reinstated Björgvin Björgvinsson – a policeman who said women who are raped while intoxicated should “bear some responsibility” for being raped – and he is back in his position as chief of the police’s sex crimes division.
Björgvin made the remarks in an interview with DV last August. At the time, he brought up that many female victims of sexual assault were intoxicated on drugs or alcohol at the time of their attacks, and thus bear some of the blame. The remarks sparked a public outcry that extended all the way up to former Minister of Justice Ragna Árnadóttir, who told reporters that it was “out of the question” that victims of rape bear any responsibility for what happened to them.
Although Björgvin was soon thereafter removed from his position, he was still employed elsewhere on the force. Earlier today, Vísir reports, he was reinstated to his previous position.
Chief of Police Stefán Eiríksson, who made the request himself, told reporters that Björgvin was asked to review his position on the matter. Having done so, he was re-hired.
A statement from the police adds furthermore that Björgvin has the full trust of the force, and that he was instrumental in solving a recent murder case.
The initial statements from Björgvin drew the ire of many Icelanders, among them Guðrún Jónsdóttir, spokesperson for the sexual assault crisis center Stígamót. She told Vísir at the time that shr sincerely hoped Björgvin was misquoted, because if not, they would have to immediately express their lack of trust in him.
“It is against the law to rape a woman, regardless of what condition she’s in,” she added. “Behind every rape there is at least one rapist, and Björgvin says that women have themselves to blame if they are raped while drunk. With this, he is indirectly contending the innocence of the rapist who rapes a woman in another state of mind.”



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Volcano Watch: Bárðarbunga And Holuhraun Update

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Bárðarbunga caldera continues to subside at the same rate as before, roughly half a metre per day, reports the Institute of Earth Sciences. Large earthquakes are still being detected in the Bárðarbunga caldera, several with a magnitudes over 3, some over 5. The lava production at the currently active Holuhraun eruption continues to be strong. The lava flow is now around the centre of the lava field, which has grown to around 37 square kilometres. As reported, scientists in the field estimate that around 90% of the SO2 gas coming from the eruption originates in the active craters and only 10%

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Creditors Closer To Pay Out

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The outlook for hedge funds caught in Iceland’s $85 billion banking failure may be looking up, reports Bloomberg. The administrators overseeing claims against one of the three banks that defaulted in 2008, Glitnir Bank hf, say recent talks with a government committee indicate that it will now be easier to complete creditor settlements. “My impression is that the government had until now not been ready,” Steinunn Guðbjartsdóttir, head of Glitnir’s winding-up committee, told Bloomberg. “Now that they’ve got their processes in place, it will be possible to complete this sooner rather than later.” The main obstacle to repaying creditors has

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Poison Gas Cloud Heading Northeast

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The Icelandic Met Office predicts sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas from the Holuhraun eruption will move north and east over the next 24 hours. As can be seen, the Met Office has two maps for predicted areas where significant levels of SO2 will be present. Egilsstaðir and Reyðarfjörður are expected to be hit the hardest by the gas, which continues to pour out of the Holuhraun eruption site. However, levels of SO2 will vary from region to region, and even from hour to hour. A more detailed map allows one to see the forecast movement of SO2 concentrations through Tuesday. Simply

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Special Prosecutor Accused Of Illegal Phone Taps

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A former employee of the Office of the Special Prosecutor says the office tapped phones of suspects illegally. The Minister of Justice believes the matter needs to be investigated. In an interview with Fréttablaðið, former Special Prosecutor’s Office employee Jón Óttar Ólafsson said that the office listened in on illegal taps of phone conversations of clients and lawyers alike. Both the Special Prosecutor (shown above) and the State Prosecutor have dismissed the allegations as completely untrue. However, RÚV reports that Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson – serving in his capacity as acting Justice Minister – believes the matter warrants further

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Foreign Ministry Harshly Criticised

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The Minister of Foreign Affairs has received some backlash over his decision to close the Icelandic International Development Agency. While the Agency will be absorbed by the Foreign Ministry, Vísir reports, the move is not without its critics. Minister of Foreign Affairs Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson told reporters for RÚV that when his office examined the best way to continue developmental aid, they came to the conclusion that the best strategy would be to bring the Agency into the Ministry. However, this contention is not supported by a report done on the subject for the Ministry in 2008, when Ingibjörg Sólrún

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Icelanders Use 200 Litres Of Water Per Day

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The water consumption of Icelanders is so high, it corresponds to each Icelander using about 200 litres of water each day, reports RÚV. According to the UN Water, about 50-100 litres of water is needed per day for personal use, meaning that Icelanders are using two times more water per day than is necessary. Comparatively, the water resources available to each Icelander is roughly 530.000 cubic metres where are as Norwegians, for example, have 80.000 m3 and Danes only 3000 m3. Water usage in Iceland has increased considerably over the past few years. The UN states that 85% of the world population

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