A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: The Holuhraun eruption is at it again
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Interview
Standing Still

Standing Still

Published June 25, 2004

Name?
Birgir Örn Thoroddsen
Where are you from?
Err…. I’m from the City of Árbær.
What are you doing?
I’m going to the opening of Paul McCarthys & Jason Rhoads’s art show; The Sheep Plug. It’s at gallery Kling & Bang.

Two days.

It’s unspoiled nature. No, wait, we fucked that up already. Then it’s…hum…ahh.. The clean and unpolluted air we breathe here.
What is wrong with Iceland?
Public paralysis, the population’s inability to protest against anything (see page 6 for some helpful pointers -ed.)
What’s your favourite spot in Reykjavík?
The spot where you can see over all of Reykjavík when you drive down Ártúnsbrekka.
What can Iceland learn from the outside world?
It can get more variation from the outside world.
What can Iceland teach the outside world?
We can teach the world how to respect other people. Well, no, I forgot how we behave in the weekends. Let’s say we can teach the world how to make the present blend in with nature.
Where would you prefer to live?
In Reykjavík.



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