A Grapevine service announcement Pay attention: Holuhraun, still spewing lava. Bárðarbunga, still sinking.
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Grapevine Airwaves Friday

Grapevine Airwaves Friday

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This Is Not The First Time We’ve Seen Change

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Reykjavík Art Museum’s Hafnarhús is making more noise than usual. Normally a quiet gallery building, today it’s throbbing with bass, the big glass windows rattling in their frames. Through an open service door, the cavernous main hall ripples with light—against the back of the stage, three huge projected figures made of geometric shapes blossom then deteriorate into mazes and matrices of neon lines. Sound techs run around with arms full of coiled leads, and a battalion of lights strafes the stage through thick mist. The building is warming up for Gusgus to present their latest album ‘Mexico’ in Reykjavík for

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The Puffinisation Of A Country: Tourism Today

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When Grapevine started in 2003, we were in the midst of what at the time seemed like a considerable tourism boom. The number of tourists per year was fast approaching the number of the population as a whole, or 300,000. Earlier that year, Iceland Express (a precursor to WOW Air) started flying to London and Copenhagen (soon branching out to other destinations), making travel to the island more affordable. And yet the fledgling tourism boom went largely unnoticed by most. Everyone was putting their money in banks and aluminium plants to get rich quick. A notable exception was Icelandair, with

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Growing Pains

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In the aftermath of 2008’s TOTAL ECONOMIC COLLAPSE, scores of Icelanders found themselves struggling to make ends meet as jobs became scarce and household debt skyrocketed. The nation collectively struggled to come up with ways to pull itself up by the bootstraps; the government assembled expert panels while enthusiastic citizen groups established think tanks (and faltering tycoons founded predatory instant loan businesses), all trying to determine: where can we score some cash? In 2010, a solution finally appeared in the form of the infamous Eyjafjallajökull eruption, which stalled air traffic all over Europe and made Iceland a household name in

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Old Masters, New Dude

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He’s young—only 36—but creates his work using the same methods that artists employed hundreds of years ago. His techniques are like those of the Old Masters (even though it’s impossible to say for certain exactly what methods they employed). He paints in oil with turpentine and rabbit skin glue on canvas, old-school style, and uses a steady build-up of layers to craft his images. It takes him anywhere from a few weeks to several months to finish a painting, waiting for each layer he sets down to dry before he starts on the next. His palette is subdued and rich,

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Páll Óskar: In The Name Of Love

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The front door is wide open. Giving a little tap on the wooden frame, I hear the boom of his instantly recognisable voice greeting me from the next room. The one and only Páll Óskar strolls into the foyer motioning that he’s on the phone, and leans in to give me the kind of casual half-hug you do with your best friend. Páll Óskar and I are meeting for the first time yet this feels utterly natural, genial, cordial, no false formalities. His sharp black sweatshirt may be scrawled with the word ‘hype’ but Páll is nothing but relaxed. A

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Best Of Reykjavík 2014 (Photo Gallery)

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Once a year, we like to take a step back and celebrate our little city. It’s not that Reykjavík is a city without problems, or that it’s a place that doesn’t have plenty of ways in which it could improve. This probably goes without saying. We at Grapevine spend a lot of time being critical, after all, and by and large we’re a bunch of cynics. But once a year we like to set all that aside and appreciate the things that make Reykjavík a pretty great place to live. As ever, our BEST OF REYKJAVÍK! issue is about big-upping

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