Mag
Opinion
Where do they go from here?

Where do they go from here?

Published January 14, 2005

Davíð Oddsson
Having spent almost a decade as top dog in the city, and then another decade as top dog in the country, people wondered what he would do when he left office. Before he entered politics he was a promising actor, and his performances in Áramótaskaupið and the annual RÚV news first of April spoof prove that he’s still got it. However, a man of his age and build would probably mostly get Edward G. Robinson or Oliver Hardy parts, which may not be appealing to someone used to being a leading man. He has also released two volumes of short stories, but the one book everyone will be waiting for is his biography, mostly to see whether he will slag off the current President. To everyone’s surprise, he decided to stay on the cabinet as Foreign Minister. And people were even more surprised when his first high profile decision went against the American alliance by offering Bobby Fischer a residence permit. The unpredictable Oddsson may not have strayed too far from his roots in absurdist theatre after all.

Jennifer Aniston
For a decade she was America’s sweetheart. Eclipsing both her co-leading ladies in Friends, she was the most desirable woman in television. Then she married the most desirable man in the world. Aniston was probably the most envied woman on the face of the earth. With films such as Bruce Almighty and Along Came Polly, she has so far been the most successful Friend in cinema but has yet to prove that her charm can make the transition from the small to the big screen. And then came the bombshell, Brad Pitt dumped her. Whom do you sleep with after the most beautiful man in the world? A genius? Who cares. Aniston is still a star post-hubby. But she is no longer the most envied woman in the world. That title will probably go to whomever Pitt dates next.

Bill Clinton
For eight years he was the most powerful man in the world. He was President of the United States in an interregnum between Republican incumbents when the US was generally admired and respected. When he toured Eastern Europe shortly after the collapse of communism, he was hailed as liberator. When his term was up in January 2001, he had a hell of a resume, but hasn’t been able to hold a steady job since. But what do you do after having been the most powerful man in the world? With his autobiography generally considered a bore, and his talked about talk show not seeming likely to materialise, his brightest career prospect might be as the United States first First Husband, Mr. Hillary Clinton.



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