Mag
Opinion
Where do they go from here?

Where do they go from here?

Published January 14, 2005

Davíð Oddsson
Having spent almost a decade as top dog in the city, and then another decade as top dog in the country, people wondered what he would do when he left office. Before he entered politics he was a promising actor, and his performances in Áramótaskaupið and the annual RÚV news first of April spoof prove that he’s still got it. However, a man of his age and build would probably mostly get Edward G. Robinson or Oliver Hardy parts, which may not be appealing to someone used to being a leading man. He has also released two volumes of short stories, but the one book everyone will be waiting for is his biography, mostly to see whether he will slag off the current President. To everyone’s surprise, he decided to stay on the cabinet as Foreign Minister. And people were even more surprised when his first high profile decision went against the American alliance by offering Bobby Fischer a residence permit. The unpredictable Oddsson may not have strayed too far from his roots in absurdist theatre after all.

Jennifer Aniston
For a decade she was America’s sweetheart. Eclipsing both her co-leading ladies in Friends, she was the most desirable woman in television. Then she married the most desirable man in the world. Aniston was probably the most envied woman on the face of the earth. With films such as Bruce Almighty and Along Came Polly, she has so far been the most successful Friend in cinema but has yet to prove that her charm can make the transition from the small to the big screen. And then came the bombshell, Brad Pitt dumped her. Whom do you sleep with after the most beautiful man in the world? A genius? Who cares. Aniston is still a star post-hubby. But she is no longer the most envied woman in the world. That title will probably go to whomever Pitt dates next.

Bill Clinton
For eight years he was the most powerful man in the world. He was President of the United States in an interregnum between Republican incumbents when the US was generally admired and respected. When he toured Eastern Europe shortly after the collapse of communism, he was hailed as liberator. When his term was up in January 2001, he had a hell of a resume, but hasn’t been able to hold a steady job since. But what do you do after having been the most powerful man in the world? With his autobiography generally considered a bore, and his talked about talk show not seeming likely to materialise, his brightest career prospect might be as the United States first First Husband, Mr. Hillary Clinton.



Mag
Opinion
Don’t Ask Nanna

Don’t Ask Nanna

by

Dear Nanna I’m confused about the Icelandic practice of using the -dottir and -son suffix instead of last names. Does that mean you guys change your last names for every generation? How do you keep track of who’s who?  Thanks, Son of Question Mark Dear Son of Question Mark, We manage. Nanna   Dear Nanna, An Icelandic friend of mine says he is considering going into rehab. I’ve been trying to tell him about some alternative holistic therapies I found to help him with his recovery but he just brushes me off. I feel like he’s acting really unappreciative and

Mag
Opinion
For The Record

For The Record

by

The Holocaust remains incomprehensible in its totality. The goose steps taken towards it, while horrendous on their own, can seem less other-wordly. The photograph accompanying this article is taken in Vienna in 1938. The women are put on display on a public square, wearing a sign that says: I have been expelled from the people’s community. The young men behind the women are preparing to shave off their hair, as a crowd watches. Such displays were not uncommon. The reasons could involve being Jewish, communist, gay, lazy, or —as in this case— having sexual relations with Jews. At a symposium

Mag
Opinion
Hope In Dangerous Times

Hope In Dangerous Times

by

The year 2014 has left me asking what it really means to be Icelandic, and whether that might be something I should feel embarrassed about. Because looking back, I kinda do. For Iceland, last year was marked by a plethora of major scandals, especially in the fields of politics and law enforcement. We witnessed our politicians and oligarchs make sickening attempts to shut down any and every attempt at investigative journalism. We were subjected to the nature pass, attempts to militarise our police force, Biggi the cop, Hanna Birna, livestock farmers’ systematic mistreatment of animals, a corrupt dairy monopoly, the

Mag
Opinion
We Need 1,000,000 Humans, Stat

We Need 1,000,000 Humans, Stat

by

At the end of 2014, we find ourselves inhabiting a Western welfare state, a pretty good one thank you very much. However, we need about a million more people to make things more interesting and fun. The coming year will bring endless nagging about our horrible government and the garbage Progressive Party. This will ultimately prove inconsequential, because the bourgeoisie will inevitably fall for whatever new hocus pocus tricks our rulers will come up with for the next elections. The year’s optimal outcome—since it’s not very realistic to imagine we’ll get an extra million people to Iceland by the end

Mag
Opinion
Shattered Conceptions

Shattered Conceptions

by

In 2014, we saw that politicians are not afraid to attack institutions and ideals that some of us had—naïvely, I admit—come to take for granted. We thought we all agreed to keep public radio alive; we thought we all wanted lower taxes on culture and healthy foods and a higher asking price for natural resources; we thought we were forever free to roam our own country; we thought we were kind and tolerant and peaceful and welcoming; we thought we had agreed to fight inequality and safeguard the communal; we even thought our politicians—also those we disagreed with—were mostly intelligent

Mag
Opinion
No Authority

No Authority

by

Unfortunately, I fear that 2014 will be remembered as the year when Iceland took a turn from being a Nordic welfare state, towards becoming a society marked by neoliberalism and harsh individualism. Iceland’s right-wing government is currently engaging in a full-scale attack on the foundations of the welfare system that has served as the backbone and unifying force of our society for decades. Our healthcare system is in grave danger, so much so that it may take years to repair the damage. Our upper secondary school system is further undermined by being closed off to those over the age of

Show Me More!