A Grapevine service announcement Be patient: That eruption is expected to last until 2015

Things They Like About Reykjavík

Published July 20, 2012

Sif Arnarsdóttir – Marathon Runner
I think I’d have to say Sushi Samba since I’m planning to go there in few days. But Tapashúsið, Sjávarkjallarinn, Fiskifélagið, Grillmarkaðurinn are obviously all good. What I quite like about Sushi Samba is that you can go for few bites of sushi if you don’t want to spend much, but you can also go for a big meal.

Wally WallysonClown
I’ve been to Stofan recently. The atmosphere is nothing to talk about. It’s a bunch of nerds running the bar. That’s what it is. No music, no games, no nothing. Tourists, yuck. To be honest, it’s quite disgusting. Its one claim to fame is that it’s the closest possible place to my home.

Annie MistCrossfit Champion
Ingólfstorg, because it’s a nice place to hang out, especially in the summer time. You can sit down and chill with your friends. You can take your lunch. I was in school at Menntaskólinn í Reykjavík, one of downtown’s oldest buildings, and you were able to walk from school to there and have lunch if you wanted to. We were there for my cousin’s bachelorette party. It was really nice. It was a sunny day. It had a picnic feeling.

Gerður Kristny – Writer/Poet
The old cemetery, Hólavallagarður: It is a peaceful and beautiful old cemetery with a long history, especially the part where the victims of the Spanish flu are buried. There are even unmarked mass graves that few people know about. People believed that the first one to be buried there would be the watcher because he would find no rest because he had to guard the place. Check it out!

Curver Thoroddsen – Musician/Artist
The best thing about Reykjavík is the rise of neighbourhood markets and festivals over the summer. It’s been very uplifting to see an explosion of this positive community building after the depressing and negative vibe of the economic crash in 2008. This summer we’ve been seeing a whole lot of these summer markets, like Borgarstígur, Norðurmýri, Marargata and the Vesturbæjar flea market. These markets have been a very positive thing, and I think an indicator of people turning away from materialistic thinking that happened in 2007. This has been kind of a way for building from within.

Dorothee Kirch – Director
There’s a small restaurant on Austurstræti called Aldin I like because it has fantastic food. They always have a one-meat-and-one-fish meal, and about six or seven salads or vegetable meals that you can choose from. It’s just exquisite, all kind greats of spices. And it’s affordable. They have great sweet potatoes with some really nice spices; they have roasted aubergines. I hope it stays there for a long time.

Malcolm Kenneth 
Fraser – Facebook User
The best thing about Reykjavík has to be the geothermal pools. Whenever I feel I might be catching a cold, I alternate between the hot pots and the steam bath of Vesturbæjarlaug, and that’s it, CURED! It’s barely more expensive than a box of paracetamol tablets.

Þorbjörn 
Broddason – Professor

Laugarnes, because it’s so calm and you can watch Snæfellness and the islands. You can even see Akranes. It’s a small island of the Reykjavik harbour to the west. I’m a romantic person, and it puts me in a very nice frame of mind. It calms you down. How much more sentimental can you get? It makes you feel one with nature. It’s an emotional thing. It’s your feelings.



Mag
Articles
<?php the_title(); ?>

CLOSED DOORS, EMPTY STOMACH, DESPERATE MEASURES

by

Adam was standing in the rain when I picked him up. He had just come from an appointment with a woman at the Red Cross, telling them about his hunger strike and the reasons for it. “They were nice,” he said, with a slightly exasperated air. “I asked her if they could send my body back to Iraq if I die. She was sad and said ‘please don’t say that’. But I really want to know. My mother and my sisters will want to see me for the last time.” He placed his briefcase neatly in his lap. This was

Mag
Articles
<?php the_title(); ?>

The New Kids On The Block

by

Laugavegur, quite the dandy’s lane, is swarming with trendy menswear addresses that all offer a certain vision of what lavishly dressed men should be. Enter Skyrta (“Shirt”), a newly launched Icelandic made-to-measure shirt company that lets the local peacocks decide what spiffing shirts should look like. With customers in our blogger era more fashion-savvy than ever before, giving the reigns of design to the customer makes total sense. To learn more about Skyrta, I visit founder Leslie Dcunha and art director Terence Samuel Devos at their headquarters on Klapparstígur, just off Laugavegur. They have clearly worked hard to make it

Mag
Articles
<?php the_title(); ?>

Microphonic Body Machine

by

Ekeberg Park, Oslo: The September sun reflects in yellow leaves. Angela Rawlings and her colleagues reach the centre of the posh sculpture-park: a forest of glass. The walls capture, care for, and feed back the voice of Angela and a partner in crime, Elfi Sverdrup, transforming a gentle acoustic test into what Angela herself calls “an unanticipated partnership.” And what a partner Angela makes; the 2001 recipient of the bpNichol Award for Distinction in Writing, an award winning poet, a much sought after arts educator; of creative writing, ballroom-, swing-, and salsa dancing—and a producer of festivals, magazines, magical soundworks, plus so

Mag
Articles
<?php the_title(); ?>

Was Literature’s First Man On The Moon An Icelandic Peasant?

by

My name is Duracotus and my fatherland Iceland called Thule by the ancients. My mother, Fiolxhilde who died recently left me at leisure to write something which I already ardently desired to do. While she lived she diligently saw to it that I did not write, for she said that there were many malicious usurpers of the arts, who, because they did not understand anything, on account of the ignorance of their mind, misrepresented them and made laws detrimental to the human race. Under these laws, many men would assuredly have been condemned and swallowed up in the abysses of

Mag
Articles
<?php the_title(); ?>

Keeping The Romance Alive

by

In our third and final instalment of “Mexicans: They’re Everywhere,” we meet Libertad Venegas. Prior to her first visit to Iceland, the only thing she knew about the country was that it was home to a famous singer called Björk. For Libertad, that tiny speck of earth above Europe with the intimidating name was a land of total mystery. As fate would have it, Libertad wound up falling in love with an Icelander she met online. After a period of courtship, the two made plans to convene in person, and, as they say, the rest is history. “I was going

Mag
Articles
<?php the_title(); ?>

The Endless Bubble Of Overblown Expectations

by

In the spring of 2007, when the Icelandic financial bubble was reaching its peak, the Ministry of Industry held a press conference to announce it intended to undertake an environmental impact assessment of oil exploration off the coast of Northeast Iceland, near the Jan-Mayen ridge. The press was quick to see what this meant: Untold riches! “Oil exploration might begin next summer,” the headlines read, and many Icelanders, who had already started to believe the country was on its way to becoming a North Atlantic Switzerland could now fantasize about living in an Arctic Saudi Arabia. Although there was no

Show Me More!